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10 AirPlay-Ready iPad Apps That Make Apple TV Worth It

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 March 2012 9:35 pm

While you can technically beam your entire iPad screen onto your TV using AirPlay, there are certain things that the feature is best suited for. For the most part, it’s great for streaming video. When you’re navigating the iPad’s home screen, launching apps or trying to use apps that have fluid animations, there’s a noticeable lag. It’s really too bad. Google Earth, for example, would be cool on a TV.

What the feature is primarily intended for is watching video content, and it does that quite well. Even so, some apps offer a better experience than others.

1. YouTube

It might seem too obvious to mention, but YouTube’s iPad app is an essential one for the Apple TV. The same is true of its tablet-optimized mobile Web app. There is a YouTube app that ships with the Apple TV, but searching the world’s largest user-submitted video site from a tablet is a much better experience than typing letters in one-by-one using the Apple remote.

Despite its tendency toward shorter videos, YouTube is quickly becoming a mainstay in many living rooms, as viewers turn toward the service for everything from music videos and funny viral clips to longer-form videos that are slowly making their way onto YouTube as Google gets serious about premium content.

2. Netflix

Again, this is an obvious choice, but it shouldn’t be excluded from this list. Like YouTube, Netflix is already included on the Apple TV, but the user interface is quite different on the iPad. Most importantly, one can navigate the app by touching and typing rather than tediously pointing a remote at the screen. Netflix subscribers who own an Apple TV and an iPad will probably spend quite a bit of time with this app.

boxee-ipad-app.png

3. Boxee

In addition to its own Apple TV-style set-top box, Boxee offers an iPad app that includes some of the platform’s best features.

Like the Boxee media player UI, its iPad app pulls in videos that are shared by your friends on Facebook and Twitter, much like Flipboard does for written content. Another one of Boxee’s most useful features is its “Watch Later” queue, which you can populate using its browser bookmarklet, Instapaper-style. If you come across a great TED talk, music video or mini-documentary during the course of your day and don’t have time to watch it, just click the button.

The Boxee app also allows you to stream videos that are stored locally on your computer using its Media Manager. If you have a lot of video files, this feature helps make up for the Apple TV’s lack of external storage.

showyou-ipad-app.png

4. ShowYou

ShowYou is another app that curates video content via your social connections, and it does a really great job of it. The UI is a little nicer than Boxee’s and it takes better advantage of the screen’s real estate by providing a massive array of recently shared videos on a grid, which you can navigate by swiping left or down.

ShowYou pulls off the social curation quite well, but this isn’t all the app does. It also sports YouTube integration, lets you follow other ShowYou users, and offers curated categories of content like Art Design, Comedy and Music. All told, there is a ton of video content packed into this one little app and it works exceptionally well on the TV screen.

5. PBS

While networks and cable channels struggle with how to offer content to tablet users without upsetting the existing order, PBS is a bit more liberal. Its iPad app features full episodes of many programs, including Frontline, Nova and News Hour. Conspicuously absent is the wildly popular Downton Abbey, which is normally available to stream online while the season is airing.

PBS doesn’t make videos available indefinitely and the selection is somewhat limited, but they do a better job than most networks of offering content to tablet users without requiring a cable subscription to view it.

6. Al Jazeera (English)

As far as iPad apps go, Al Jazeera’s is pretty bare bones. It doesn’t have a slick, fluid UI that will blow you away, but rather its value is in the content it offers. In the United States, Al Jazeera English is not carried by most cable operators, even though the network has received praise from sources as unlikely as Donald Rumsfeld for its coverage of recent turmoil in the Middle East.

This app solves that problem, at least for iPad and Apple TV owners. The first tab is a live stream of whatever is being broadcast on Al Jazeera English at the moment. The other three tabs are just parts of the channel’s websites framed into the app, and unfortunately not all of the video content found there is in a tablet-ready HTML5 format. Still, the live stream alone makes this app worth watching.

ted-ipad-app.png

7. TED

TED’s is another well-designed, video-heavy iPad app that works well on the TV screen. Since some TED talks are on the longer side, they’re even more appropriate for the “lean back” viewing experience.

The app itself is great. The content never expires and it can be navigated by recency, theme, tags or even adjectives like “courageous,” “funny” or “jaw-dropping.” You can also save your favorite talks locally so they don’t need to be streamed.

8. Guardian Eyewitness

Video is the only thing for which the TV screen is well-suited. The Guardian’s popular Eyewitness app is simply a slideshow of full-screen, beautiful news photographs from around the world.

In terms of functionality, you could hardly get more simplistic, but these images comprise some of the best recent examples of photojournalism and they deserve to admired on a big screen.

9 + 10. Rdio and MOG

Then there’s music. More and more, people are using their Internet-connected TV as a sort of modern, household jukebox. Apps like Pandora are standard on many smart TVs these days, and streaming services like Spotify and MOG have been quick to develop their own apps for various Internet TV platforms.

Which app you go for will obviously depend on which service you’re subscribed to. As far as user experience goes, Rdio and MOG both win for having developed form factor-appropriate apps for the iPad, rather than scaling up their iPhone apps. We wish we could say the same for Spotify, which is apparently still working on that particular feature.

Of course, if you already subscribe to Spotify, go ahead and use their app to stream music from your TV. It works just fine and a bad UI isn’t exactly a deal-killer for an app whose sole purpose is to deliver sounds rather than pictures.

Red Hat Takes Linux from Free to Over $1 Billion

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 March 2012 3:34 pm

Red Hat is the first pure play open source and Linux vendor to achieve the $1 billion milestone. For the year, Red Hat’s revenues were reported at $1.13 billion for a 25 percent year-over-year gain. GAAP Net Income for the full year was reported at $146.6 million or $0.75 per diluted share, which is a dramatic gain over the $107.3 million or $0.55 per diluted share reported for fiscal 2011.

“Red Hat associates around the globe have contributed to 40 straight quarters of sequential revenue growth, culminating in fiscal 2012 revenue that exceeded the $1 billion mark,” Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst said during his company’s earnings call. “Red Hat has become the first pure-play open source company and one of a few select software companies to have ever achieved this milestone.”

Red Hat’s success flows from its loyal customer base. Whitehurst reported that for the year, Red Hat renewed 99 out of their top 100 accounts with 130 percent revenue growth for those accounts.

Gains were also made from Red Hat’s effort to convert free Linux users to paying Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscribers. Red Hat has actively been pursuing its Free to Pay program since at least 2008 as a way to help grow revenues.

“We continue to deliver consistent results from our Free to Pay program this year,” Whitehurst said. “We added significant deals throughout the year, and during the fourth quarter, we saw one 7-figure deal and one 6-figure deal that included a Free to Pay component.”

Read the full story at Datamation:
Red Hat Hits $1 Billion, But It’s Only the Third Inning

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

A quad-core Windows 8 laptop more ultra than an ultrabook?

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 March 2012 9:29 am

Can a quad-core Windows 8 laptop be as thin as an
iPad? That’s the design Qualcomm is aiming for. But we’ve heard this story before.

The San Diego-based chip supplier anticipates superthin laptops running Windows 8 on top of its Snapdragon chips, according to a report in PC World.

It’s certainly an enticing idea: Laptops lighter and thinner than even Intel-based ultrabooks — an idea also put forward by Nvidia, which already supplies its well-received quad-core Tegra 3 processor to Asus for its Tranformer Prime
tablet.

At a macro level, this is about ARM versus Intel on Windows 8, which will be compatible with both chip technologies. More specifically, it’s about the camp of chip suppliers, like Qualcomm and Nvidia, that use a power-efficient silicon design versus performance-centric Intel.

The argument goes something like this: ARM-based laptops can be thinner and lighter than an ultrabook — as thin as a tablet because power-sipping ARM processors don’t require fans (Intel-based ultrabooks do).

Qualcomm made a similar argument a couple of years ago, in fact. At that time, it made a lot of noise about Linux-based “smartbooks.” And Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs even “announced” one from Lenovo — which never saw the light of day, by the way. Nor did any smartbook.

Though Windows 8 offers more hope than Linux, a competitive ARM-based laptop will be a bigger challenge than either Qualcomm or Nvidia anticipate, because Intel is a moving target, and a pretty fast one at that.

Intel’s highly integrated (and likely much faster) Haswell chip will be available in the timeframe in which Qualcomm announces its quad-core Snapdragon.

Moreover, it’s not clear how soon Windows 8 will be ready for ARM. Microsoft is carefully choosing its words here. The company’s Steven Sinofsky said on his blog that Microsoft’s “collective goal” is for Windows 8 on Intel and ARM to become available at the same time. That tells me Microsoft is leaving itself some wiggle room for ARM.

Moreover, Microsoft, on the same blog, made it clear that Windows compatibility on Intel chips will be radically broader than on ARM chips.

But there’s still plenty of opportunity for Qualcomm and Nvidia, because Windows 8 tablets will probably favor ARM chips, for the power-efficiency reasons cited above.

So, Qualcomm, Nvidia, et al would be well-advised to focus more on proselytizing tabletlike designs, not laptops, which have been, and will always be, an Intel stronghold.

10 AirPlay-Ready iPad Apps That Make Apple TV Worth It

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 March 2012 3:27 am

While you can technically beam your entire iPad screen onto your TV using AirPlay, there are certain things that the feature is best suited for. For the most part, it’s great for streaming video. When you’re navigating the iPad’s home screen, launching apps or trying to use apps that have fluid animations, there’s a noticeable lag. It’s really too bad. Google Earth, for example, would be cool on a TV.

What the feature is primarily intended for is watching video content, and it does that quite well. Even so, some apps offer a better experience than others.

1. YouTube

It might seem too obvious to mention, but YouTube’s iPad app is an essential one for the Apple TV. The same is true of its tablet-optimized mobile Web app. There is a YouTube app that ships with the Apple TV, but searching the world’s largest user-submitted video site from a tablet is a much better experience than typing letters in one-by-one using the Apple remote.

Despite its tendency toward shorter videos, YouTube is quickly becoming a mainstay in many living rooms, as viewers turn toward the service for everything from music videos and funny viral clips to longer-form videos that are slowly making their way onto YouTube as Google gets serious about premium content.

2. Netflix

Again, this is an obvious choice, but it shouldn’t be excluded from this list. Like YouTube, Netflix is already included on the Apple TV, but the user interface is quite different on the iPad. Most importantly, one can navigate the app by touching and typing rather than tediously pointing a remote at the screen. Netflix subscribers who own an Apple TV and an iPad will probably spend quite a bit of time with this app.

boxee-ipad-app.png

3. Boxee

In addition to its own Apple TV-style set-top box, Boxee offers an iPad app that includes some of the platform’s best features.

Like the Boxee media player UI, its iPad app pulls in videos that are shared by your friends on Facebook and Twitter, much like Flipboard does for written content. Another one of Boxee’s most useful features is its “Watch Later” queue, which you can populate using its browser bookmarklet, Instapaper-style. If you come across a great TED talk, music video or mini-documentary during the course of your day and don’t have time to watch it, just click the button.

The Boxee app also allows you to stream videos that are stored locally on your computer using its Media Manager. If you have a lot of video files, this feature helps make up for the Apple TV’s lack of external storage.

showyou-ipad-app.png

4. ShowYou

ShowYou is another app that curates video content via your social connections, and it does a really great job of it. The UI is a little nicer than Boxee’s and it takes better advantage of the screen’s real estate by providing a massive array of recently shared videos on a grid, which you can navigate by swiping left or down.

ShowYou pulls off the social curation quite well, but this isn’t all the app does. It also sports YouTube integration, lets you follow other ShowYou users, and offers curated categories of content like Art Design, Comedy and Music. All told, there is a ton of video content packed into this one little app and it works exceptionally well on the TV screen.

5. PBS

While networks and cable channels struggle with how to offer content to tablet users without upsetting the existing order, PBS is a bit more liberal. Its iPad app features full episodes of many programs, including Frontline, Nova and News Hour. Conspicuously absent is the wildly popular Downton Abbey, which is normally available to stream online while the season is airing.

PBS doesn’t make videos available indefinitely and the selection is somewhat limited, but they do a better job than most networks of offering content to tablet users without requiring a cable subscription to view it.

6. Al Jazeera (English)

As far as iPad apps go, Al Jazeera’s is pretty bare bones. It doesn’t have a slick, fluid UI that will blow you away, but rather its value is in the content it offers. In the United States, Al Jazeera English is not carried by most cable operators, even though the network has received praise from sources as unlikely as Donald Rumsfeld for its coverage of recent turmoil in the Middle East.

This app solves that problem, at least for iPad and Apple TV owners. The first tab is a live stream of whatever is being broadcast on Al Jazeera English at the moment. The other three tabs are just parts of the channel’s websites framed into the app, and unfortunately not all of the video content found there is in a tablet-ready HTML5 format. Still, the live stream alone makes this app worth watching.

ted-ipad-app.png

7. TED

TED’s is another well-designed, video-heavy iPad app that works well on the TV screen. Since some TED talks are on the longer side, they’re even more appropriate for the “lean back” viewing experience.

The app itself is great. The content never expires and it can be navigated by recency, theme, tags or even adjectives like “courageous,” “funny” or “jaw-dropping.” You can also save your favorite talks locally so they don’t need to be streamed.

8. Guardian Eyewitness

Video is the only thing for which the TV screen is well-suited. The Guardian’s popular Eyewitness app is simply a slideshow of full-screen, beautiful news photographs from around the world.

In terms of functionality, you could hardly get more simplistic, but these images comprise some of the best recent examples of photojournalism and they deserve to admired on a big screen.

9 + 10. Rdio and MOG

Then there’s music. More and more, people are using their Internet-connected TV as a sort of modern, household jukebox. Apps like Pandora are standard on many smart TVs these days, and streaming services like Spotify and MOG have been quick to develop their own apps for various Internet TV platforms.

Which app you go for will obviously depend on which service you’re subscribed to. As far as user experience goes, Rdio and MOG both win for having developed form factor-appropriate apps for the iPad, rather than scaling up their iPhone apps. We wish we could say the same for Spotify, which is apparently still working on that particular feature.

Of course, if you already subscribe to Spotify, go ahead and use their app to stream music from your TV. It works just fine and a bad UI isn’t exactly a deal-killer for an app whose sole purpose is to deliver sounds rather than pictures.

Red Hat Takes Linux from Free to Over $1 Billion

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 30 March 2012 9:25 pm

Red Hat is the first pure play open source and Linux vendor to achieve the $1 billion milestone. For the year, Red Hat’s revenues were reported at $1.13 billion for a 25 percent year-over-year gain. GAAP Net Income for the full year was reported at $146.6 million or $0.75 per diluted share, which is a dramatic gain over the $107.3 million or $0.55 per diluted share reported for fiscal 2011.

“Red Hat associates around the globe have contributed to 40 straight quarters of sequential revenue growth, culminating in fiscal 2012 revenue that exceeded the $1 billion mark,” Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst said during his company’s earnings call. “Red Hat has become the first pure-play open source company and one of a few select software companies to have ever achieved this milestone.”

Red Hat’s success flows from its loyal customer base. Whitehurst reported that for the year, Red Hat renewed 99 out of their top 100 accounts with 130 percent revenue growth for those accounts.

Gains were also made from Red Hat’s effort to convert free Linux users to paying Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscribers. Red Hat has actively been pursuing its Free to Pay program since at least 2008 as a way to help grow revenues.

“We continue to deliver consistent results from our Free to Pay program this year,” Whitehurst said. “We added significant deals throughout the year, and during the fourth quarter, we saw one 7-figure deal and one 6-figure deal that included a Free to Pay component.”

Read the full story at Datamation:
Red Hat Hits $1 Billion, But It’s Only the Third Inning

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Android Ice Cream Sandwich coming to Motorola Droid Razr and Razr Maxx, April 4

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 30 March 2012 3:25 pm

A leaked image from Best Buy shows the dates of ICS updates.

(Credit:
Android Police)

Ice Cream Sandwich cravers, rejoice.

According to Android Police, a leaked image from Best Buy shows that the Motorola Droid Razr and Droid Razr Maxx from Verizon will get an OS update to Ice Cream Sandwich on April 4.

Two days later on April 6, the HTC Rezound will get the same scoop of
Android ICS.

A few days prior, another carrier, ATT, announced a number of its devices will be getting an upgrade as well. Some of these handsets include the LG Nitro, the Samsung Galaxy Note, and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9.

3 Approaches to Securing Identity in the Cloud

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 30 March 2012 9:24 am

Radiant Logic RadiantOne

My friend and colleague David Strom introduced you to Radiant Logic last July. As you may recall, it offers what it describes as “identity-as-a-service,” and its customers are enterprises looking to federate their employees’ identity across multiple applications, both in the cloud and on-premise.

The “as-a-service” phrase is a surprising choice of words from a company that came to be known, and still is known, for providing on-premise identity management tools. How does Radiant Logic manage to provide a service it depicts as inside the firewall, from a cloud-based location that’s most definitively outside?

“It’s a tough thing to do, but if you look at most enterprises today, they have 80%, 90% of their infrastructure inside the firewall, on-premise,” responds Dieter Schuller, the company’s VP for business development. “You can’t just flip a switch and move everything off-site into the cloud and still have what you have running today.”

120330 Radiant Logic federated identity.jpg

Michel Prompt, Radiant Logic’s CEO, demonstrates for us his company’s concept of virtualized identity – providing each enterprise application, both in and outside the cloud, with a token in the format it expects and accepts. His example depicts four classes of prominent Web applications, all of which handle authentication internally, and all of which manage identity criteria for themselves. On paper, they all support some form of identity federation, but in the end they each expect your identity to be “consumable” in a different format, often with varying degrees of content. The challenge for any federation service, Prompt explains, becomes keeping up with the ability to translate identity into the formats all these apps expect, as your business’s apps repertoire grows and more identity formats are added to the mix.

The second challenge, Prompt continues, is for the federation service to maintain links between all the different formats, and tie those links to maybe more than one directory service. Microsoft utilizes Active Directory (AD) for Windows, and all of Windows Server’s per-user policies regarding permissions and restrictions are tied to each user’s AD entry, as well as her Windows password. Oracle Directory Services and Google Apps Directory add their own variations on the theme, even though all are (on paper) implementations of LDAP.

So Radiant Logic’s RadiantOne platform, while marketed “as a service,” is actually implemented as an “identity hub” whose communication with both cloud apps and on-premise apps takes place with a traditional service (by the Windows Server definition), one that truly does reside on-premise. And while RL gets your attention by marketing its identity service with the hyphens still attached, the actual job of servicing takes place between its virtual directory service component VDS and the applications, wherever they reside. VDS presents a picture of AD to whatever identity system knows how to translate its preferred format for AD.

It’s still a federation service, maintains Prompt, because it performs the functions that any other federation service provides. But it does not have to be “architected” by the IT department; it provides this service dynamically. He admits that his company is moving away from the “as-a-service” distinction for RadiantOne’s on-premise hub, in favor of the phrase “federation identity service for the cloud.” But it’s not purchasable as a service, or on a subscription basis. Today, he says, it’s not practical to place the hub outside the firewall because of all the synchronization that’s involved in maintaining identity (the clock is indeed one factor), “and it could even be quite dangerous. It’s not that we don’t like the idea of hosting it on the cloud.” Reality, he says, mandates that the hub be deployed internally.

OneID

120328 OneID 02.jpg

At the RSA security conference in San Francisco last month, a startup company named OneID introduced itself to the community, as well as to several interested journalists. Its concept is not identity federation, which is typically something that is managed on the client side. It’s an effort to enable Web sites and Web apps to resolve the multiple identities problem themselves, not by continuing their (futile) discussions on creating (more) standards. Instead, OneID compels service providers to attach JavaScript code to their logins that exchanges their users’ passwords with a centralized repository.

Because the exchange process is encrypted, OneID CEO Steve Kirsch explains to us, the repository itself doesn’t actually have access to its own contents. So unlike some certain social networks or search engines, OneID itself has no intentions to leverage users’ identities as a database unto itself. But the decryption process takes place on the client side.

120328 OneID 01.jpg

“When I need to get an attribute and give it to a site, I go get the encrypted stuff from the repository, I decrypt it here, and then I send it to the site,” explains Kirsch. “So the site never interacts directly with my repository. The site’s always interacting with me, and I’m always interacting with my repository. That’s why it’s called user-centric, because I’m always in the middle of any transaction.”

One of the compelling aspects of OneID’s take on identity is that it applies to people. You’d think that would be obvious, but in practice, typical identity federation associates passwords with users’ accounts. Although in Windows, accounts are portable across computers, there’s still a concept of a “desktop,” a virtual device, associated with each user. By contrast, OneID assumes accounts are associated with people. So attributes stored in the repository that may be used to automatically fill in forms (which OneID calls AccuFill), are associated with people who may logically be associated with more than one device at a time. That makes sense in the real world, where people have PCs, tablets and smartphones, and where new classes of apps are transferrable between them.

120328 OneID 03.jpg

One upshot of this architecture, Kirsch shows us, is that it enables a cross-device audit trail – a way for anyone, from anywhere, to see who has logged in as him from which device. Kirsch demonstrated for us a situation where a user can remotely disassociate a device that has been utilized to log onto services with OneID. Alternately, a device can be remotely registered into OneID by way of a pairing process that resembles logging in a Bluetooth device. This way, only permitted devices may be allowed to log in as particular people.

Ping Identity PingOne

We’ve covered PingFederate, Ping Identity’s federation system, previously in ReadWriteWeb. Since then, the company has inaugurated its new cloud-based identity platform, PingOne, which may or may not be federation by the traditional definition.

PingOne is a cloud-based implementation of the company’s adaptive federation scheme, and it challenges the notion put forth earlier that the component that communicates identity must exist inside the firewall. The new service truly is a service by the new, cloud-oriented standard – literally a RESTful API. Enterprises that already utilize a SAML security infrastructure can simply assert their existing identities to PingOne; otherwise, as Jonathan Buckley, Ping’s VP for on-demand business, tells us, Ping provides alternate tools through which existing apps are effectively rerouted to PingOne for identity.

“You don’t even need hardware, software – you don’t even need to know what SAML stands for,” says Buckley. “However you connect to it, PingOne multiplexes that assertion such that you can connect once and be able to reach many customers or applications. This is where the cost and complexity of federation held back standards-based federation from penetrating meaningfully into the mid-market in the past couple of years.”

While very large organizations have already supported the SAML standard, and continue to, Buckley says that in cases where 100 or more connections are made simultaneously, on-premise federation can be too tasking. “In the end, we found our biggest customers said, ‘I would like to make these ten directly, but is there a way I can get out of doing the one-to-one-to-one-to-one networking for all these departmental applications, or for my customer applications?’ And that’s where PingOne comes in.

120330 Ping Identity CloudDesktop.jpg

The upshot of this new scheme is a feature called CloudDesktop, which effectively extends identities for multiple popular cloud apps onto a control panel that can be accessed from iPads. Here, the desktop provides the single sign-on system. But as Ping’s director of product management, Sateesh Narahari, tells us, it’s up to the administrator to enable each user’s paths to enterprise apps, putting IT back in control.

“The way PingOne solves the problem of one-to-one connections is through multiplexing by using SAML,” says Narahari. “The task of multiplexing and managing connections is something that the administrator does.” When the admin does set up connections to 100 different SaaS vendors, each one requests a different set of attributes. The admin can use the PingOne console, he explains, to define each attribute set. The end result is “an easily consumable cloud desktop that’s built for the cloud generation,” that the admin can designate for specific employees. “End users do not need to know that those connections are multiplexed connections.”

“With PingOne,” remarks Buckley, “we said, ‘How is it that we can drive towards a sort of Fisher-Price simplicity?’ In IT, everybody attempts that… But with our 49 beta customers, it seems that we’ve dramatically driven down the time to implement and the sophistication required to grok what is going on and then implement it for the company. You can stick with standards, stick with best practices, and leverage technology to make things simpler, versus putting time into developing a password vaulting solution – which we’ve always been tempted to do, because sometimes things are hard. And then we found a way to have… better security, better convenience, without so much of the hassle for that mid-market company.”

Puppet Enterprise 2.5 Extends Beyond Configuration

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 30 March 2012 3:14 am

The open source Puppet configuration management and automation tool has been widely used by an ever-increasing base of users, big and small. The new Puppet Enterprise 2.5 release announced this week takes that base a step further with advanced configuration tools that extend across Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

The open source Puppet configuration management and automation tool has been widely used by an ever-increasing base of users, big and small. The new Puppet Enterprise 2.5 release announced this week takes that base a step further with advanced configuration tools that extend across Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

Going a step further, the new Puppet release is moving beyond just configuration automation. The Puppet Data Library leverages all the configuration information that Puppet collects to help provide a comprehensive view of an enterprise infrastructure.

“There is a huge amount of data in infrastructure, and we’ve taken all the parts of Puppet that relate to data and wrapped them up into the Puppet Data Library,” Kanies said. “Puppet knows a huge amount about what is going on in your infrastructure because Puppet is doing most of that work.”

Puppet has both hardware and software inventory data that is collected in an automated way. The system also provides a configuration graph that has information on all the users, groups and services that are managed as well as the various dependencies across them all.

Read the full story at ServerWatch:
Puppet Enterprise 2.5 Takes Aim at Infrastructure

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Puppet Enterprise 2.5 Extends Beyond Configuration

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 30 March 2012 3:14 am

The open source Puppet configuration management and automation tool has been widely used by an ever-increasing base of users, big and small. The new Puppet Enterprise 2.5 release announced this week takes that base a step further with advanced configuration tools that extend across Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

The open source Puppet configuration management and automation tool has been widely used by an ever-increasing base of users, big and small. The new Puppet Enterprise 2.5 release announced this week takes that base a step further with advanced configuration tools that extend across Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

Going a step further, the new Puppet release is moving beyond just configuration automation. The Puppet Data Library leverages all the configuration information that Puppet collects to help provide a comprehensive view of an enterprise infrastructure.

“There is a huge amount of data in infrastructure, and we’ve taken all the parts of Puppet that relate to data and wrapped them up into the Puppet Data Library,” Kanies said. “Puppet knows a huge amount about what is going on in your infrastructure because Puppet is doing most of that work.”

Puppet has both hardware and software inventory data that is collected in an automated way. The system also provides a configuration graph that has information on all the users, groups and services that are managed as well as the various dependencies across them all.

Read the full story at ServerWatch:
Puppet Enterprise 2.5 Takes Aim at Infrastructure

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Puppet Enterprise 2.5 Extends Beyond Configuration

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 30 March 2012 3:14 am

The open source Puppet configuration management and automation tool has been widely used by an ever-increasing base of users, big and small. The new Puppet Enterprise 2.5 release announced this week takes that base a step further with advanced configuration tools that extend across Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

The open source Puppet configuration management and automation tool has been widely used by an ever-increasing base of users, big and small. The new Puppet Enterprise 2.5 release announced this week takes that base a step further with advanced configuration tools that extend across Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

Going a step further, the new Puppet release is moving beyond just configuration automation. The Puppet Data Library leverages all the configuration information that Puppet collects to help provide a comprehensive view of an enterprise infrastructure.

“There is a huge amount of data in infrastructure, and we’ve taken all the parts of Puppet that relate to data and wrapped them up into the Puppet Data Library,” Kanies said. “Puppet knows a huge amount about what is going on in your infrastructure because Puppet is doing most of that work.”

Puppet has both hardware and software inventory data that is collected in an automated way. The system also provides a configuration graph that has information on all the users, groups and services that are managed as well as the various dependencies across them all.

Read the full story at ServerWatch:
Puppet Enterprise 2.5 Takes Aim at Infrastructure

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

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