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Apple, U.K. regulator continue their ‘4G’ dance

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Monday 30 April 2012 11:08 pm

The U.K.’s advertising regulator continues to battle with Apple over its claims that the
iPad 3 is 4G-capable.

A letter seen by the BBC suggests the U.K.’s Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is willing to “close the file” on its investigation should Apple agree to amend its claims that U.K. customers can access the 4G network.

Two problems: first, Apple appears to be standing its ground, causing further headaches for the regulator, despite the iPad 3’s inability to connect to any 4G network outside the U.S. and Canada.

And second, the U.K. doesn’t even have a commercial 4G network yet.

It comes a month after the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission (ACCC) took Apple to court over similar claims, after the maker of shiny rectangles sold the device in the country knowing full well it wouldn’t connect to its 4G networks — while still advertising the
tablet as a 4G-capable device.

The ASA warned that it was “aware of the news from Australia” and asked consumers to file a complaint. In just over a month, the regulator has received “dozens of complaints” over lack of 4G connectivity.

The regulator suggested Apple should remove any mentions of “4G” on its U.K. Web site, saying this would resolve the dispute. Apple said it would make “no further reference” to 4G, and would amend its advertising. The technology giant even edited a video to remove any references to the next-generation mobile broadband service, which has yet to get off the ground in the U.K.

And it did, but only to a degree. It still markets the iPad 3’s “Wi-Fi + 4G” model which lies at the heart of the ASA’s argument. Herein lies the problem.

Apple doesn’t want to market the new iPad as anything other than a 4G tablet.

Apple said it adds footnotes to its pages for clarity. The first footnote on the U.K. store page says: “4G LTE is supported only on ATT and Verizon networks in the U.S., and on Bell, Rogers and Telus networks in Canada. See your carrier for details,” but makes an effort to bury the news further down the page rather at the stage where the user selects an iPad model for purchase.

In Australia, Apple is trying to change the term “3G” into “4G” to circumvent the complaints. Terms like 2G, 3G, and 4G are not industry-defined, and speeds can vary.

But because U.K. consumers “know” what 3G speeds are and have been used to such speeds for over a decade, Apple will have a hard time convincing the regulators and the British public — just so it can keep its advertisements intact.

Apple declined to comment.

This story originally appeared at ZDNet under the headline “UK authorities battle with Apple over ‘4G’ claims.”

The Rise of Beautiful Apps

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Monday 30 April 2012 5:07 pm


A noticeable trend this year is beautiful apps or websites. It’s all part of a larger trend that I’m calling The Visual Web, meaning that images and video are becoming an increasingly important part of what we consume online. Pinterest is the best example of that larger trend. But by “beautiful apps or websites,” I’m specifically referring to extremely well-designed apps or websites. Ones that make you drool. Of course, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But I think we all agree that Johnny Depp and Reese Witherspoon are particularly fine examples of beauty in human form. So what’s the app equivalent of Johnny Depp? Or the website version of Reese Witherspoon?

Red Hat OpenShift FINALLY Goes Open Source with Origin

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Monday 30 April 2012 11:05 am

Red Hat OpenShift Origin

From the ‘Open Source PaaS’ files:

Ever since Red Hat first announced their OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service project, I have asked Red Hat when it would be fully open source. This morning I got an email from Red Hat telling me that the day has finally come, almost a year after OpenShift itself first debuted.

To be fair, OpenShift didn’t start out as a Red Hat effort, it was started off as a proprietary effort by a company called Makara that Red Hat acquired. Taking proprietary code and making it open source is no easy task, though it is one that Red Hat has done before with former Netscape directory technology among other efforts.

With OpenShift the open source project will be operated and known as OpenShift Origin and in a shift (pun intended) from many of Red Hat’s other open source efforts, the project will be hosted on Github.The overall goal for Red Hat is to grow an active community of contributions that go beyond Red Hat.

It’s an idea that VMware, with their Cloud Foundry effort have been pushing for a year as well. Yet as opposed to Open Shift, CloudFoundry was an open source project from day one. Yes it is a bit ironic.

In many respects Open Shift is an excellent platform already and the Origin effort could make it even better. In other respects, Red Hat is already lagging behind the large vendor ecosystem that VMware’s Cloud Foundry has built, so Origin really does have its work cut out for it. It will also be interesting to see how OpenShift Origin works and integrates with Red Hat’s OpenStack efforts and how and were they might all integrate with CloudForms (their IaaS effort).

 

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Verizon, Comcast join forces in six new markets

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Monday 30 April 2012 5:02 am

Verizon and Comcast(Credit:
CNET)

The Verizon and Comcast cross-selling romance deepens today as each offers each others’ network and entertainment services in six new markets around the U.S.

Atlanta, Chicago, Kansas City, Mo., Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., and Salt Lake City are four new cities to access the duo’s deals, in addition to the state of Colorado. The expansion follows an earlier West Coast launch in San Francisco, Portland, Or., and Seattle.

New and existing customers can purchase Comcast’s Xfinity entertainment products and services in Verizon stores, and in return, Comcast offers Verizon voice and wireless products through its channels, including delivering mobile video.

In order to sweeten the deal, Verizon and Comcast are luring customers both new and old with chances to qualify for a Visa prepaid cards ($50 to $300).

There’s also and an offer to double your Verizon 4G LTE data cap along with a free year-long upgrade to Comcast’s Blast Xfinity Internet service.

Top 5 Ways To Freak Out Potential Investors

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 29 April 2012 10:57 pm


No one believes they have an ugly baby. And all entrepreneurs are convinced that their businesses are better than the other guy’s. So chances are you’re sure (or at least really hopeful) investors will be lining up, eager to put money into your business.

 Angels, VCs and banks take a more clear-eyed approach. If they see any of these five warning signs, they’re likely to put away their wallets and head for the hills.

Ubuntu 12.04 Linux Focusses on the OpenStack Cloud

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 29 April 2012 4:54 pm

On the cloud front, Ubuntu 12.04 includes the OpenStack Essex release. The OpenStack support is a shift from what Ubuntu 10.04 offered with cloud support via the Eucalyptus project. Ubuntu shifted away from Eucalyptus as its primary cloud technology in the 11.04 “Natty Narwhal” release.

The difference with 12.04 is that this is an LTS release, meaning that Canonical will support it for five years. Going a step further, Canonical has also pledged to backport support for the next four upcoming releases of OpenStack to 12.04, providing enterprise customers with the prospect of a stable operating system base.

“This allows customers to get access to the latest features of OpenStack without having to change their underlying platform,” Baker said. “It’s a change for us, since normally with things that are in an LTS release, we don’t make commitments to supporting newer versions, but we’ve made an exception with OpenStack.”

While OpenStack is now supported by Ubuntu’s Linux rivals SUSE and Red Hat as well, neither of these vendors has made a similar commitment to providing long term support for release backports on an enterprise Linux distribution base.

Read the full story at ServerWatch:
Ubuntu 12.04 Linux Aims Precisely at the Cloud

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Harmony universal remotes: What’s the best one for you?

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 29 April 2012 10:53 am

Logitech Harmony One(Credit:
Logitech)

Longtime CNET readers know that we’ve always liked Harmony remotes (even in the days before the original Canadian company, Intrigue Technologies, was purchased by Logitech). Harmony models pioneered the idea of “Web-programmable” consumer electronics: tell the software what products you own and how they’re connected, and the software uploads all of the codes to the remote, preprogrammed into task-based activities such as “Watch TV,” “Watch a movie,” “Listen to music,” and so forth.

As of now, however, the lineup of Harmony remotes is arguably as good — and as affordable — as it’s ever been. However, with eight current models (and several more older ones that are still available through various retailers), distinguishing among them can be a bit confusing. So we decided to create this cheat sheet to make choosing as easy as possible:

<!–

table.geekbox th{background-color:text-align:left;font-weight:bold;}
table.geekbox tr.even{background-color:}
.ratingGood{color:} .ratingAverage{color:} .ratingBad{color:}
Model Devices
controlled Control
compatibility
LCD
screen?
Rechargeable
option?
Supports
custom
sequences?
Street
price
Harmony 200
3
IR
None
None*
No
$20
Harmony 300/300i
4
IR
None
None*
No
$30
Harmony 650
5
IR
Color
None*
tk
$50-60
Harmony 700
6
IR
Color
Yes (USB)
tk
$90
Harmony One
15
IR
Color
touch-screen
Yes (cradle)
Yes
$140-180
Harmony 900
15
IR + RF
Color
touch-screen
Yes (cradle)
No
$240-350
Harmony 1100
15
IR + RF
Tablet-style color touch screen
Yes (cradle)
No
$260-350
Harmony Link
8
IR
Uses phone or
tablet screen
Yes (cradle)
No
$100

–>

Harmony tips

Some tips for choosing the Harmony that’s best for you:

Start by determining how many products you’ll need to control. If you’ve got six devices, don’t get one of the remotes that only controls five or fewer. And remember that Harmony remotes should be able to replace any infrared-based remotes, including those for ceiling fans.

The actual price may be lower than the suggested retail price. Even if the list price is too steep for you, be sure to click through and check the retail price. It’s often lower — sometimes significantly so.

RF compatibility is a great upgrade — but be prepared to pay for it. Control compatibility refers to infrared (IR) or radio frequency (RF). Every product you own (with the notable exception of the
PlayStation 3 — see below) almost certainly uses IR control, but that requires line of sight to the product’s IR receiver. If you want to hide your home theater gear in a cabinet, you’ll want to invest in one of the RF models, which include RF-to-IR blasters (small accessories that convert the radio commands — which work through obstructions — to the IR emitters that are in turn placed near the receiving devices).

If detailed, multistep custom macros are important to you, a Harmony model probably isn’t the best choice. A small group of advanced users values the ability to program custom multidevice macros, to do things like raise the lights when putting a movie on pause. They’ve been extremely frustrated to find that Logitech’s most advanced and expensive models don’t support them (the Harmony One is pretty much the only one left that does). Logitech calls macros “sequences,” but the cheaper remotes only support sequences of five steps — not enough to do extensive programming. We think 95 percent of the audience won’t find this to be a problem, but that passionate five percent of advanced users will probably want to look elsewhere. Models from URC and Acoustic Research are a good start.

this accessory, which converts IR commands to PS3-friendly Bluetooth. Yes, it’s annoying that you need to pay an extra $50-$60 for this, but it works flawlessly.

Feel free to buy your own rechargeable batteries. None of the sub-$100 remotes includes rechargeable batteries. If that’s important to you, you can always invest in two pairs of your own rechargeable batteries, and swap them in and out as needed.

Barebones Harmony models are now available for $20 to $30. Once upon a time, Harmony prices started at $60 or above — but no longer. The Harmony 200 and Harmony 300 can be had for no more than $20 or $30, respectively. That said, these models control only three or four products, and are best for simple bedroom or den systems, not big living room home theaters with AV receivers or more than four devices.

Don’t think $100 is too much to spend for a remote. Yes, it looks like a lot of money. It is a lot of money, especially when you’ve been used to picking up “universal remotes” at the drug store for $20. But trust us: even the mid-level Harmony models are a great investment that are well worth their purchase price.

The software will still frustrate newbies and non-techies. The latest version of Logitech’s software is much improved over earlier versions, but — as good as it is — it can still frustrate those who aren’t techies. And there’s definitely some trial and error involved when setting up a Harmony, even if the process is completely smooth. If you’re buying one of these as a gift for a non-geek, you might need to volunteer to help set it up. (For more Harmony frustrations and suggestions, see Five ways Logitech can improve Harmony remotes.)

Best bets

The Logitech Harmony 700 is a great all-around choice.

(Credit:
CNET)

Best bang for your universal remote buck: Harmony 650/700: These two models shares nearly identical designs, with just very tiny feature differences. They’re separated in price by as little as $30. If you’re not ready to make the leap to the Harmony One, either of these will be an ideal living-room remote for most people. (The Harmony 600 is now discontinued, but you might be able to find it at a closeout price at some retailers.)

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony 650.

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony 700.

Best RF remotes: Harmony One/900: In 2008, we called the Harmony One “one of the best–if not the best–universal remote we’ve ever tested.” That description still stands. If you need to control more than six devices–and you can spend upwards of $150 on a remote–the Harmony One is the one to get. Go for the 900 if you need RF support (and can live without custom sequences).

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony One.

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony 900.

Logitech Harmony 200

The Harmony 200 is the cheapest Logitech remote you can buy, but it only controls three devices.

(Credit:
Logitech)

Best bargain remotes: Harmony 200/300: These are Logitech’s more recent entry-level remotes. They have no LCD and lack most of the task-based commands found on all other Harmony remotes, but they’re available for as little as $20.

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony 200.

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony 300.

Other models

Harmony 1100: Personally, I’ve never been a fan of the
tablet design for remotes. The 900’s hard keys plus small touch-screen design is a better design, in my opinion. But the tablet-style touch-screen design has a lot of fans. Those folks should check out the Logitech Harmony 1100.

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony 1100.

Harmony Link: It sounds like a great idea: use your iPad,
iPhone, iPod Touch, or Android phone as a touch-screen remote. And, indeed, the Harmony Link (which converts commands via Wi-Fi from a free Harmony app to IR commands that your TV, game console, or stereo can understand) works as promised. But again, you’re stuck with a touch-screen interface, which is better in theory than in practice. But the bigger problem may be that the iPad app’s built-in TV programming guide isn’t as robust as some of the similar free apps you can get from cable and satellite providers.

Read the full review of the Logitech Harmony Link.

What’s your favorite Harmony universal remote? Have you had good experiences or bad? Or do you prefer a Harmony competitor? Share your thoughts below.

Editors’ note: This story was originally posted on May 28, 2010, but has since been updated.

New iPhone, iPad and Android Apps for April 2012

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 29 April 2012 4:23 am

Cross Platform

GiddyUp — (Free — iOS, Android)

GiddyUp is the next evolution of group messaging apps. Generate an event, select the friends you want to invite from your phone’s address book and GiddyUp will send them a text message. Keep people up to date with a built-in group chat. Add notes, geo-tagged locations, share to Facebook or Twitter, save events in your calendar and use the real-time attendance tracker. 

MyHeritage — (Free — iOS, Android)

MyHeritage is an Ancestry.com competitor with many of the same features. Create a family tree, a profile page and take it with you on the go. It also lives in the present with the ability to capture and share family moments within the app and stay in touch with relatives. 


CTERA Mobile — (Free — iOS, Android)

There is no shortage of cloud and document syncing apps. Most are built to function well in a mobile environment but CTERA does it specifically for mobile device. The iOS app was released in February but the Android app came out this month so we will let it slide into our cross platform section this month. Designed to work with the CTERA Portal and CTERA Cloud, the app securely downloads documents and allows you to store them on your device. Supports .doc, .xls, .pdf, .mp4 and other standards. Allows you to save attachments from emails and upload them to your CTERA Cloud. Supports photos as well. 


Springpad — (Free — iOS, Android)

Springpad as a service is nothing new. What is new about Springpad this month is pretty much everything. We got at what Springpad was up to in its Boston offices in January and came away impressed. GigaOm described Springpad as, “Evernote and Pinterest just had a baby.” With all new iOS and Android apps this month, Springpad has been relaunched for the mobile generation. Create notebooks of your interests and share them with your Springpad friends. Content could be your shopping list, wish list, movies you want to see or have seen, recipes or pretty much anything that you can think of. Do comparative shopping, scan barcodes, save audio notes and save all your data for offline use. Springpad used to be more of a service that operated as a personal cloud that helped you organize your files. It is now a full-fledged consumer app with as much or as little functionality that you might desire.

Staff Picks


Jon Mitchell — Writer

Drafts — ($0.99 — iPhone)

For an action the length of a note (or a tweet), there’s no faster way to get it out than through this app. It launches to a new, blank note each time. Drafts saves your notes in a list, and they can be found quickly with full-text search.

Now that your note is out of your head, you can relax and decide what to do with it. That’s where the action menu comes in. You can send a note directly to a variety of text editors, including ones that sync with iCloud or Dropbox. You can tweet a draft, email it, send it as a text or iMessage, or copy it to the clipboard.



Robyn Tippins — Community Manager

Tapatalk Forum App — ($2.99 — iOS, Android)

Call me old fashioned, but I still love forums.  I read forums relating to video games, parenting and health on a regular basis, especially while I’m watching television in the evening.  One of my favorite apps for iOS is the Tapatalk forum app, because it makes reading forums on an iPad easier.  Navigating through a forum on an iOS device isn’t particularly difficult, but because of the size of the text on webpages, I do often click the wrong threads.  Tapatalk prevents these fat finger moments, and makes my time on forums on the iPad an enjoyable experience.


iOS

ReadWrite Recommends iOS App of the Month:

Onion Browser — ($0.99 — iPhone, iPad)

Onion Browser is a Tor-capable Web browser that lets you surf the Internet anonymously and privately. There was a time that Apple would not have let a third-party browser, let alone one that is Tor enabled, into the App Store. But, after allowing Dolphin and Opera in as third-party options in 2011 and deprecating the Unique Device ID (UDID), it seems Apple has shifted its thinking on browsers and privacy. The Onion Browser should be heralded both for its open source roots (Tor Project and the Electronic Frontier Foundation), its commitment to privacy and its implementation. Websites do not see your real IP address, your connection is encrypted from the device (not the Web portal), third party cookies are blocked and Web accessed is tunneled through the Tor onion network. Will bypass restrictive firewalls. It is one thing to use a personal VPN like Hotspot Shield but it is another to have a mobile browser that functions in much the same way. 


Fragile Earth — ($2.99 — iPhone, iPad)

HarperCollins is on an app spree. This is the second month in a row we have chosen a HarperCollins app to be included in Apps of the Month and both have been well worth the consideration. Last monty it was Brian Cox’s Wonders of the Universe, this month we get Fragile Earth. From the App Store description, “The app contains some of the best environmental images showing before and after scenes of our natural world. This is one of the top photography apps for showing the changing world giving you detailed ecological snapshots from around the globe.”


Lonely Planet — (Free — iPhone)

Lonely Planet provides travel guides for your iPhone. The app is free but you have to pay to download the actual country and city guides. We have seen a lot of city guide types come to smartphones and tablets but many of them are just the physical copy of travel books republished in app form. Lonely Planet’s guides actually function as apps. They are downloading and can be used offline (helpful when there is spotty data connections abroad) and can use GPS without a data connection. Audio phrasebooks for 25 languages and has Lonely Planet and BBC content you can read and listen to while you are galavanting across the world. Next time I am traveling, this is probably the app that I am taking with me. 


MokaFive — (Free — iPhone, iPad)

The iPhone is replacing the BlackBerry as the go-to corporate device. MokaFive is capitalizing on that trend and provides secure access to sanctioned corporate networks and files. Files can be downloaded and stored locally in an encrypted “bubble” known as the LiveData container. MokaFive can be securely managed and secured by an enterprise’s IT department. 


FileMaker Go 12 — (Free — iPhone)

In keeping with the enterprise theme, FileMaker Go 12 allows users to access FileMaker databases from their iPhones. Import and export FileMaker data in Excel, CSV, Tab and HTML files. Record video or audio and integrate it to the database from the iPhone and adds multi-tasking support. 


Ourcast Weather — (Free — iPhone)

Weather apps are not exactly the height of innovation. The Weather Channel App (especially for the iPad) is probably still the best out available but there is still room for some cool stuff to be done (see the Android section for another cool one). Ourcast reminds me of Back To The Future II when Doc Brown can tell the precise moment that it will stop raining. That is what Ourcast tries to do. From the App Store description, “Ourcast is the weather app that tells you if there will be rain, or snow, in any location you choose, during any minute over the next 2 hours.” Predictable, location-aware weather in your pocket? Now that is pretty cool.

 


Android

ReadWrite Recommends Android App of the Month:

Instagram — (Free)

This was pretty much a no-brainer choice for Android April App of the Month for ReadWrite Recommends. If you are not familiar with Instagram, well, where have you been hiding? Thirty million iPhone users cannot be wrong, can they? When Instagram released an Android app earlier this month the service added five million users in a matter of days. The company was then acquired by Facebook for a billion dollars and added another five million users. For the uninitiated, Instagram is a photo-sharing based social network that provides cool filters to make your photos look like a Hipster’s Paradise. 


Google Drive — (Free)

Android apps this month are top-heavy with some big releases by major publishers. Instagram is one, Google Drive is another. Google has done well within the last year in releasing fully functional Android apps for services it launches. The Google+ app had good reviews when the search company released it social network last June and Google Drive for Android delivers as well. That is, if you care anything about Google Drive. This is Google’s Box, Dropbox, Evernote, Amazon Cloud Locker competitor and integrates with Google Apps like Docs and allows you to upload files directly from your Android device to Drive. Offline access, document editing and video, photo, file access are the primary features of Drive.

Clarizen — (Free, Subscription-based)

Another business app. There was a time when we thought that the Apps of the Month was becoming a little game-heavy but, oddly, we did not find many new decent games this month (Max Payne’s release was delayed until May). Clarizen is a collaborative, cloud-based task management app that can help organizations manage work, projects and portfolios. Good for sales teams, project managers and keeping track of expenses when working with a client. Available for iOS but the Andriod app is new this month.

WeatherWise — (Free)

WeatherWise came to Android this month and it is one of the coolest and quirkiest weather apps out there. It is an animated, theme-based app with the Zen Tree the default theme and additional themes available for $0.99. All the stuff you would expect from a weather app with high degree of visual diversity. Worth a look. 


Generate All The Memes — (Free)

You ever wonder how people created those weird picture and video-based memes that are all over the Web? I never really did but apparently it is becoming a lot easier to do so. Generate All The Meme (GATM) is an app that allows you to create a picture with some funny text and share it with your friends. 140 different memes, 10,000 user made image memes to browse and a ton of laughs. If you are in to that sort of thing. 

500px — (Free)

500px is not new, but it is new to Android. What is significant about this app is that it is specifically design for Android tablets. We do not see a lot of those these days. 500px is a photo discovery app that acts like a picture frame that generates beautiful landscapes, treasured moments and stunning photography. It is the standward Web-based photo sharing website (like Flickr) brought to mobile with a fury.


Notable Updates

It is always important to remember to go into your device and update apps on a regular basis. Updates provide new functionality, performance and security upgrades and ensure that the bugs from the last version have been taken care of.

Note, with the short turnaround on Apps of the Month, this list is not as long as it would normally be. 

iOS Updates

  • Draw Something Free, Slacker Radio, Washington Post for iPad, Clear, Google Catalogs, iBooks, Rdio, Scanner Pro, Google Play Books, Plants Vs. Zombies HD, Square Card Reader, Flixster, Cosmic Top, Triple Town, Living Earth HD, Netflix, NFL ’12 for iPad, Spotify, Official Twitter for iOS, Cut The Rope HD, Dropbox, Quora, LinkedIn (iPad optimized)

Android Updates

  • Spotify, Angry Birds, Barcode Scanner, E-Trade Mobile, Firefox, FxCamera, Google Goggles, Lookout Security, Google Maps, Minecraft Pocket Edition, Flixster, News360 for Phones, NPR News, Opera Mobile, Pocket (Read It Later), Rdio, Retro Camera, Skype, The Weather Channel, Tumblr, Official Twitter for Android, Facebook for Android, Fandango, LinkedIn, Path

Ubuntu 12.04 Linux Focusses on the OpenStack Cloud

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 28 April 2012 10:14 pm

On the cloud front, Ubuntu 12.04 includes the OpenStack Essex release. The OpenStack support is a shift from what Ubuntu 10.04 offered with cloud support via the Eucalyptus project. Ubuntu shifted away from Eucalyptus as its primary cloud technology in the 11.04 “Natty Narwhal” release.

The difference with 12.04 is that this is an LTS release, meaning that Canonical will support it for five years. Going a step further, Canonical has also pledged to backport support for the next four upcoming releases of OpenStack to 12.04, providing enterprise customers with the prospect of a stable operating system base.

“This allows customers to get access to the latest features of OpenStack without having to change their underlying platform,” Baker said. “It’s a change for us, since normally with things that are in an LTS release, we don’t make commitments to supporting newer versions, but we’ve made an exception with OpenStack.”

While OpenStack is now supported by Ubuntu’s Linux rivals SUSE and Red Hat as well, neither of these vendors has made a similar commitment to providing long term support for release backports on an enterprise Linux distribution base.

Read the full story at ServerWatch:
Ubuntu 12.04 Linux Aims Precisely at the Cloud

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

The 11-inch gaming laptop lives, with the new Origin Eon 11-S

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 28 April 2012 4:11 pm

(Credit:
Origin)

The 11-inch gaming laptop is the textbook definition of a niche product. In fact, up until now, there’s really only been one serious entry in that category, Dell’s Alienware M11x. Origin (coincidentally co-founded by some former Alienware employees) is now getting into the game, with the Eon 11-S, which the company calls a “compact high-performance laptop.”

Interestingly, this new model won’t actually double the number of 11-inch gaming laptops available, as the Alienware model is being quietly discontinued. That’s a shame, as we liked the M11x, even if it wasn’t the most practical for either serious PC gamers, or portability obsessed travellers.

Taking a bit of a shot at the current trend for slim ultrabook-style laptops, Origin CEO and co-founder Kevin Wasielewski says, “Everyone dreams of a laptop that is smaller, lighter, has a longer battery life and has the ability to play all of the latest PC games well. The EON11-S makes that dream a reality and without making any ‘ultra-sacrifices.'”

(Credit:
Origin)

The new Origin Eon 11-S will debut with Intel’s new third-generation Core i-series processors and Nvidia’s GT 650M graphics, which sounds like a basis for a good gaming rig. The company claims 6.5 hours of battery life (with Nvidia’s Optimus technology switching the GPU off as needed), and a weight under four pounds. Like the recent Eon 17-S update, the 11-inch version will also include Origin’s new finned (and frankly, a bit Alienware-like) back lid design.

The highly customizable Origin Eon 11-S is available to order now, and starts at $999.

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