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Are Incubators Really Necessary for Startup Success?

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 31 May 2012 11:47 pm


Twice a year, every tech website seems to devote lavish coverage to just what startups made it into Y Combinator’s latest class. It’s the tech world’s version of covering the presidential primaries: Plenty of these companies aren’t going to exist in a few years (or perhaps even in a few months), but some may go on to do great things.

For those of us actually bent on founding our own startups, the coverage creates mixed feelings. It’s great to see people actually making it. But all the press also reinforces the feeling that every startup needs to go through an incubator in order to succeed. That can be incredibly frustrating for startup entrepreneurs. Not only do we need to come up with a great idea, we have to make sure that it’s something that works for an incubator.

Linux Server Revenues Growing Faster Than Windows, Hit $2.4 Billion in 1Q12

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 31 May 2012 5:47 pm

From the ‘Linux = $$’ files:

IDC is out with its first quarter 2012 global server stats study and the numbers look good for Linux.

While overall global server revenues were down, Linux server revenues were up.

According to IDC, Linux servers generated $2.4 billion in revenue for vendors in the first quarter of 2012. That’s a 16.0 percent growth rate, which is better than the 1.3 percent revenue growth rate for Windows servers.

Linux still has a lot of room to grow, as Linux servers now account for 20.7 percent of global server revenues. In contrast, Windows revenues account for 50.2 percent of global server revenues. Unix represents 18.3 percent.

That’s right, Linux server revenues are greater than Unix (and yeaah Unix servers are a whole lot more $$).

The fact that Windows still holds the majority of the server market (by revenue) is a fact that I’d bet is likely to change inside of this calendar year as Linux continues to grow fast.  

Remember of course, that IDC can’t track servers that have been ‘re-purposed’ as Linux server or those servers where companies put Linux on it themselves, so the true numbers might be larger. Revenue numbers also cannot account for ‘free’ deployments of Linux, such as CentOS which are extremely common on hosting infrastructure.

 

 

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Amazon distributor lashes out at Samsung over Galaxy S III delay

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 31 May 2012 11:44 am

Samsung Galaxy S III

No Samsung Galaxy S III for you!

(Credit:
Jessica Dolcourt/CNET)

CNET Executive Editor Molly Wood has an ax to grind, but the focus of her ire isn’t crystal clear.

Last week, she ordered the global version of the Samsung Galaxy S III, in white, from Amazon.com‘s only Galaxy S III vendor, a consumer electronics reseller called BluTekUSA.

In choosing the Galaxy S III in white, Molly deliberately steered clear of the blue version, whose shipping hiccup apparently hangs on its “pebble blue” paint job.

Amazon order confirmation for the Samsung Galaxy S III

Amazon’s order confirmation for the Samsung Galaxy S III.

(Credit:
Molly Wood/CNET)

All was going dandy — Molly even received a shipping confirmation for an estimated June 6-8 delivery — until the distributor, BluTekUSA, warned Molly of a delay. And simultaneously threw Samsung under the bus.

“Thank you so much for your purchase with us,” the e-mail begins. “As you may or may not know, the release of this item has caused a major uproar throughout the cell phone world and people have been flocking to be among the
first to purchase it.”

Here’s where BluTekUSA turns on Samsung:

Up until this week, the release date, according to Samsung, has been June 1st. We were given a guarantee of delivery
by June 1st so that all of our orders could be shipped by the end of that day. Yesterday, Samsung released a statement pushing off the
release date to the open market distribution points, without guaranteeing a new specific date. We assure you that we will be one of
the first sellers in the marketplace with this item available.

We are extremely sorry for any inconvenience this causes you
but we do hope you understand that this was in no way intentional and
we are only going off the words and guarantees of the manufacturer.

This is why the listing states “* * This listing is for PRE-ORDER :
Expected despatch date [sic.] on/after 4th June 2012. Date may be subject to
change, if there is any delay to the launch date from Manufacturer.

With a company as large as Samsung you can only work with what
they give you. We will be keeping all of your information open for the
moment the item is delivered.

BluTekUSA’s original shipping confirmation is clearly misleading (why assure your customer you’ll ship a product that you don’t actually have?), but does fit into the company’s new estimated time frame. The hurdle, however, could signal a shortage or manufacturing trip-up on Samsung’s end.

Another CNET reader cited a similar experience ordering the Galaxy S III from Expansys, to a Canadian address, noting that Expansys didn’t come clean about a hold-up until he reached out first.

CNET has requested comment from both Samsung and BluTekUSA.

[Video] Q&A About the New Chromebook & Chromebox

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 31 May 2012 5:41 am

Jon has been testing the new Google Chromebook and Chromebox for a couple weeks. He and Dan discussed whether these things are ready for prime time. Then Dan’s audio cut out, so he continued to mime comments while Jon answered reader questions. There were lots of them! We hope this video answers all your Chrome OS questions, and if not, leave some more in the comments.

Google’s Chrome OS Lands in Chromebox

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Wednesday 30 May 2012 11:36 pm

Chrome OS first debuted in 2009 as an network based operating system that is tightly coupled with Google’s online services. With Chrome OS, users need to always be connected to the Internet and access application by way of the Chrome browser that is the cornerstone of the operating system.

In 2011, Google expanded the vision of Chrome with the official release of the Chromebook reference architecture for hardware. Multiple hardware vendors including Samsung adopted the model and released Chromebook notebooks into the market.

Now the model for Chrome OS is expanding to thin computing with the debut of the Chromebox. The Chromebox is built by Samsung and is a small footprint device that can be connected to up to two external monitors. The device includes 6 USB ports of connectivity and is powerChromeboxed by an Intel Core processor supported by 4 GB of RAM. List price for the new Chromebox is $329 USD.

The Chromebox is being joined by a new generation of Chromebooks that will also benefit from performance gains.

“The new Chromebook and Chromebox, based on Intel Core processors, are nearly three times as fast as the first-generation Chromebooks,” Google stated in a blog post. “And support for hardware-accelerated graphics, a built-from-scratch multi-touch trackpad and an open-source firmware stack provide a much faster and more responsive computing experience.”

Read the full story at Datamation:
Google Updates Chrome OS with New Hardware and Software

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Google’s Chrome OS Lands in Chromebox

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Wednesday 30 May 2012 11:36 pm

Chrome OS first debuted in 2009 as an network based operating system that is tightly coupled with Google’s online services. With Chrome OS, users need to always be connected to the Internet and access application by way of the Chrome browser that is the cornerstone of the operating system.

In 2011, Google expanded the vision of Chrome with the official release of the Chromebook reference architecture for hardware. Multiple hardware vendors including Samsung adopted the model and released Chromebook notebooks into the market.

Now the model for Chrome OS is expanding to thin computing with the debut of the Chromebox. The Chromebox is built by Samsung and is a small footprint device that can be connected to up to two external monitors. The device includes 6 USB ports of connectivity and is powerChromeboxed by an Intel Core processor supported by 4 GB of RAM. List price for the new Chromebox is $329 USD.

The Chromebox is being joined by a new generation of Chromebooks that will also benefit from performance gains.

“The new Chromebook and Chromebox, based on Intel Core processors, are nearly three times as fast as the first-generation Chromebooks,” Google stated in a blog post. “And support for hardware-accelerated graphics, a built-from-scratch multi-touch trackpad and an open-source firmware stack provide a much faster and more responsive computing experience.”

Read the full story at Datamation:
Google Updates Chrome OS with New Hardware and Software

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Fantastico! Superbe! Fabuloso! Exclusively for CNET members: Awesome savings on Rosetta Stone

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Wednesday 30 May 2012 5:17 pm

This week CNET Exclusives is partnering with Rosetta Stone to bring you an amazing deal on Rosetta Stone TOTALe.

Let’s be honest, there is a reason Rosetta Stone is everywhere — it works. Don’t miss your chance to learn a new language with listening, reading, writing, and speaking activities that will have you sounding like a pro in no time. For a limited time only registered CNET Exclusives members can grab a TOTAL set of Levels 1-5 with $125 savings with complimentary next day air. With this can’t-miss deal, you will be learning by the end of the week.

Rosetta Stone

(Credit:
Rosetta Stone)

I can see it now, you’re in Rome enjoying cannoli in the shadow of the Coliseum, asking the server for “un altro esspresso per favore?” Or at least finally dropping that silent G from the beginning of gnocchi, no, it is NOT pronounce Guh-no-key.

Bottom line, it really works, it makes learning fun, and if you are not completely satisfied you can return it for a full refund of your purchase price. Fantastico! What are you waiting for? Snag this Exclusive deal today!

Why Evernote’s Hello App Is Different on iPhone and Android

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Wednesday 30 May 2012 11:16 am


The Address Book Is Broken

Evernote launched Hello for iPhone in December as a standalone app that syncs with Evernote proper. It seeks to solve a simple problem: We’re not good at remembering people, and the alphabetical address book doesn’t help.

“Everything we build at Evernote, we build for ourselves,” Libin says. “We build things that we want to use.” Libin wanted a better tool for remembering people he met by chance. “I’m just terrible at remembering people. It always gives me a lot of stress, and I worry about it.”

He’s surely not alone there. Except for those people who have the magical gift for names, this is a hard and embarrassing problem with the human brain. We’ve got technological aides, but Evernote doesn’t think the old ones do the trick.

“The old metaphor for remembering people was an address book,” Libin says. “That’s flawed because it’s alphabetical. Your brain doesn’t naturally remember people in alphabetical order by name. You remember people based on kind of what they look like, plus the context: where you met them, what else happened, who else was there.”

So Evernote Hello is designed around the actual encounter. You snap a photo, type in a bare minimum amount of info, and it creates a note in Evernote for that person. In Evernote proper, you can see all the related notes, which means that if you meet a bunch of people at the same time, they’ll all be connected in your outboard brain. In Hello itself, it displays the images as a rich mosaic of all the people you’ve met, which helps you get familiar with them.

Android Versus iOS

The basic experience of Evernote Hello is the same, but today’s new Android version brings in a bunch of new features that iPhone users don’t yet have. It looks at your calendar, call and SMS history and suggests encounters from there. So you don’t have to hand your phone to someone or even meet them in person. (If there’s someone you meet with regularly, you can filter them out in the app.)

It also connects with LinkedIn, which can make saving encounters even faster in professional situations. You can just type in the person’s email address, and Hello will pull their information from LinkedIn. It will even grab their photo, but Evernote recommends you take a pic anyway, so you can remember the face from the moment you actually met.

“It’s a pretty different experience” from the iPhone version, Libin says. So why didn’t these features come out in the iPhone version at the same time? It’s deliberate. Evernote has two different teams building each version of the app, playing to the strengths of the two platforms, and learning from each other’s performance.

“It’s two independent teams that are really trying to talk to each other while learning from [each other’s] best designs,” Libin says. “It’s a cooperative and friendly kind of competition. This way, [our teams] aren’t doing lowest-common-denominator stuff. They’re actually building full, native apps that learn from each other.”


Different Strokes

Due to the differences between iOS and Android, the two versions are bound to be slightly different. iOS doesn’t currently offer a way for Hello to hook into the phone’s call and message history like Android does. “In terms of the actual features, I think it will be like the platforms themselves,” says Libin. “Android has more stuff. There’s more hooks that make it more powerful for people. iPhone is more beautiful; it has better animation and a smoother experience.”

By iterating one at a time on different platforms, Evernote gets to see which kinds of features work and which don’t for two different user bases. Each team can adapt the other’s findings. But it also lets them play to the strengths of each platform, rather than compromising. As a result, Evernote makes its whole app better, but it also serves its users in a smarter way.

After all, these differences in platform are not just for developers to think about. As Libin points out, “That’s how people decide which phones to get, too.”

Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock

Fedora 17 Embraces OpenStack and USR Directory Simplificiation

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Wednesday 30 May 2012 5:14 am

The Red Hat sponsored Fedora Linux community this week released its beefiest distribution effort yet in Fedora 17, codenamed “The Beefy Miracle.

The inclusion of the OpenStack Essex open source cloud platform is another key inclusion in Fedora 17. OpenStack Essex was first released as an upstream project in April.

The Essex release is a key milestone for both the OpenStack community as well as Red Hat for a number of key reasons. For one, Red Hat was one of the top corporate contributors to that release, contributing more code than Ubuntu, which had been aligned with OpenStack for a longer period of time. The other key reason is that Red Hat has now officially joined the OpenStack effort, making the Fedora 17 release the first time that OpenStack has appeared in a Red Hat-led effort since that event.

From Fedora Project Leader, Robyn Bergeron’s perspective, the fact that Red Hat is now an official sponsor of OpenStack has had no bearing on how OpenStack is implemented in Fedora.

“It has been the same group of folks working on OpenStack in Fedora for the last six or seven months, and there has been no change in direction,” Bergeron said.

Read the full story at ServerWatch:
Fedora 17 Brings a Beefy Miracle to Linux

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Google+ Local launches today

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Tuesday 29 May 2012 11:14 pm

Googles Marissa Mayer.

Google’s Marissa Mayer.

(Credit:
Stephen Shankland/CNET)

Google+ is homing in on wherever you are to help you find what you’re looking for.

Debuting today is Google+ Local, a feature for the tech giant’s social network that will be available both on mobile devices and from the desktop, according to Marissa Mayer, Google’s vice president for local, maps, and location services. Mayer was speaking on the CBS This Morning show.

More to come.

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