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How To Buy A Smartphone: What Apps Do You Need?

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 30 September 2012 9:53 pm

The basic question for smartphone buyers is: What can the device do? Everything else is window dressing. Apps tell the story. (Part 6 of a 6-part series.)



Knowing which smartphone is right for you is largely a matter of knowing what you want to do with it. If you are oriented toward productivity, an iPhone or BlackBerry may be best. Android is especially good at accessing information and keeping in touch. Windows Phone is good at organizing your life and personal contacts. What makes one platform stronger or weaker for certain kinds of tasks? The answer is apps.

Apps: Ecosystems Native Features

The selection of apps is perhaps the primary reason why Apple has done so well with the iPhone. It fostered an app ecosystem full of productivity tools, personal data loggers, games, cameras, navigators, social networks, music and video services, and so on. Developers often create apps for the iPhone first because they know they can make money from iPhone users. It is rare to see an app available on Android but not on the iPhone (unless it is specific to something Android does). Apple’s App Store offers 700,000 apps. Not all of them are high-quality, but all the top apps are present and work well.

Android is not far behind, with 600,000 apps in its Google Play store. Like the App Store, Google Play also has books, movies and music for purchase. As Android grows in relation to iOS, the difference in functionality available through apps is becoming negligible. Almost all top apps are bound to be available on both platforms.

The line between the dominant Android and Apple platforms and the rest of the market is distinct. Microsoft’s Windows Phone Marketplace has about 100,000 apps and many of them are of dubious quality. (To be fair, apps that are copycats or completely useless to most people can be found in all four major app stores.) Windows Phone is the third and sometimes fourth option for developers (behind the browser-based mobile Web, including HTML5). Windows Phone Marketplace is missing many apps that people would consider must-haves. Instagram, Pandora, Flipboard, Path and RunKeeper – apps that people use on a daily basis that define their smartphone experience – are not yet available on Windows Phone. The Marketplace may offer interesting alternatives to those apps, but most smartphone users will look for the familiar titles and be disappointed when they do not find them.


BlackBerry is even worse. Most major developers do not even look at BlackBerry anymore because not many people are buying BlackBerry devices. Many apps designed for BlackBerry are relics of that platform’s enterprise business relationship (such as productivity and communication apps, as well as an inordinate number of apps related to golf). If you are looking for the most popular apps, BlackBerry is not the place to look.

A flipside to the app economies built on these platforms are the native apps that come baked in. Each operating system comes with apps to handle functions like email, talk and text, maps and navigation, as well as unique features. Apple’s Siri is a good example. The voice-activated personal assistant cannot be found in any other platform (although the others, especially Android, have their own voice-controlled services). Siri is one way Apple differentiates itself. Apple’s iCloud, its new maps applications, and PassBook are natives apps unique to Apple.

Google has a suite of specific apps for Android as well, ones that many people use on the Web and are happy to have on their mobile devices. Gmail, Talk (“GChat”), YouTube, Google Maps, Calendar and Docs are all easily accessible through Android devices.

Microsoft pushes users to its own personal cloud storage, SkyDrive, along with mobile versions of its Outlook email system and other Windows productivity apps. BlackBerry’s strongest features are its BlackBerry Messenger system as well as its fast, reliable and secure email service.

Knowing what apps are available for each operating system is an important step toward deciding which smartphone is the best choice for you. Take a look at the default selection, ask users about their favorites, and search the online app stores for functions that are important to you. That will help you differentiate one platform from another.

Part 1: The Myth Of The Perfect Device

Part 2: How Much Should You Pay?

Part 3: Which Carrier Should You Choose?

Part 4: What Do Hardware Specs Mean?

Part 5: Which Is Better, Android Or iPhone?

Part 6: What Apps Do You Need?


Driven by breakthrough thinking and a wide-open sense of what’s possible, Alcatel-Lucent delivers the world’s most advanced technologies to companies all across the globe. Our driving motivation is to realize the potential of the connected world – by providing the technologies needed to turn networks into engines of sustainable economic growth, social development and opportunity. We provide a comprehensive suite of software solutions and services offerings designed specifically to meet the needs and demands of communication network operators and strategic industries. These solutions allow our customers to optimize network costs and quickly deploy innovative, value added products and services for their subscribers that increase loyalty and create new revenue streams. To learn more about how we’re turning the network into a platform, visit http://www2.alcatel-lucent.com/hln/network_evolution.php

The Document Foundation and Open Source LibreOffice Enter Year Three

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 30 September 2012 3:49 pm

LIbreOfficeFrom the ‘Forks That Work’ files:

Some forks die off quickly. Other linger and a precious few actually prosper and excel beyond their origins. I personally would put the LibreOffice project and its masters in the Document Foundation in the latter category.

The Document Foundation is officially celebrating its second anniversary today – hard to believe it has been two years already, isn’t it? (I know I wrote the same thing when they turned one last year!).

What has changed over the last year however is a resurgence of OpenOffice, in the form of the Apache OpenOffice project. Whereas in the first year of the Document Foundation’s life OpenOffice wasn’t all that active, the same can’t be said for the second year. Apache OpenOffice 3.4 was releasedin May marking the first new release of OpenOffice under its new leadership. That event potentially could have led to new momentum for Apache OpenOffice and a decline for LibreOffice – but that didn’t happen.

Instead, after two years and a new challenge from OpenOffice, LibreOffice has stood tall. According to the Document Foundation there have been over 20 million downloads of LibreOffice inside of the last two years.

Yeaah LibreOffice and The Document Foundation still face challenges, but they have solved a few too. LibreOffice is released with a regular cadence that provides bug and stability fixes. New feature release also have a regular cadence showing an evolutionary path for a product that previously had been going nowhere fast.

So Happy Second Anniversary Document Foundation and thank you for all your effort now and in the future.

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist. ##

Oracle taps Nokia for maps

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 30 September 2012 9:29 am

Groupon, Nokia Maps
(Credit:
Nokia
)

Nokia and Oracle are expected to announce a deal tomorrow that will give Oracle customers access to Nokia’s growing stable of data and location services.

The deal, which is due to be announced at OracleWorld conference in San Francisco, is expected to expand the reach of the Finnish handset maker’s Navteq mapping services, The Wall Street Journal reported. Financial details of the arrangement were not revealed.

Nokia reportedly confirmed the deal, but CNET has contacted Nokia and Oracle for comment and will update this report when we learn more.

Nokia has been looking to ramp up the customer base for its location-based services, which it acquired with its $8.1 billion purchase of Navteq. Thanks to that 2007 acquisition, the company claims an automotive presence in more than 80 percent of in-dash navigation modules and after-market devices.

“We’re basically the world’s largest mapping company,” Hans Peter Brondmo, head of innovation for Nokia’s Location and Commerce business, told CNET in June.

In addition to supplying 3D map data for Microsoft’s online mapping services, Nokia has also partner with Groupon to provide greater context and flexibility around the maps it feeds out, particularly in mobile. In March, the company launched turn-by-turn walking directions optimized for devices with
mobile browsers.

The deal emerges as Apple battles consumer fervor over its decision to dump Google Maps from iOS6, forcing users to switch to Apple’s app, which many users found to be underwhelming or inaccurate when compared with Google’s offering.

Weekly Wrap-Up: Foxconn Riots, My Week With Android, And How To Buy A Smartphone

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 30 September 2012 3:28 am



My week with Android, or why I’m buying an iPhone 5; Foxconn riots; and how to buy a smartphone. All of this and more in the ReadWriteWeb Weekly Wrap-up.

After the jump you’ll find more of this week’s top news stories on some of the key topics that are shaping the Web – Location, App Stores and Real-Time Web – plus highlights from some of our six channels. Read on for more.

My Week With Android, Or Why I’m Buying An iPhone 5

Not long ago, one of our editors did a very bad thing: he dropped hisiPhone 4 and cracked the screen. He was very sad, but the experience proved useful as it forced him to face up to his phone future. Did he want a new iPhone 5 or was it time to switch to a different brand of smartphone, My Week With Android, Or Why I’m Buying An iPhone 5.

 

More Top Posts:

Apple Riot Aftermath: iPhone 5 Factory Remains A Powder Keg

Two days after Sunday’s riot at the Chinese Foxconn Technologies factory, the home of the Apple iPhone 5 assembly line was back up and running. But with police reportedly monitoring street corners and the factory’s main entrance, Foxconn still looks like a powder keg with a sizzling fuse, Apple Riot Aftermath: iPhone 5 Factory Remains A Powder Keg.

 

How To Buy A Smartphone: Which Is Better, Android or iPhone?

What is the difference between Android and the iPhone, really? Where do Windows Phone and BlackBerry fit in? All these platforms do basically the same thing (connect a phone to the Internet and applications), but there are fundamental differences. Determining what kind of smartphone is right for you means knowing your mobile operating systems, How To Buy A Smartphone: Which Is Better, Android or iPhone?.

 

Why I Love Apple’s Facebook Integration

The Facebook integration into Apple’s OS X and iOS brings relief. It’s the easiest, least icky, most user-friendly partnership between two major tech companies seen in a long while, and that’s saying something. The rubber has hit the road for the social Web, and it has to start making money, Why I Love Apple’s Facebook Integration.

 

Apology Accepted, Apple. Now Get To Work, Google.

When Apple showed off iOS 6 Maps in June, few could have imagined the fiasco that would ensue three months later. Indeed, the last person expecting such major fallout was CEO Tim Cook, who today issued a rare public apology. While it could have gone further, the statement was a bold move by a company not accustomed to admitting its faults, Apology Accepted, Apple. Now Get To Work, Google..

 

Facebook’s Next Privacy Issue How To Opt Out

In what is likely to become the next privacy controversy for Facebook, the social-media giant is working with a big-data firm to correlate off-line purchases with ad views on Facebook. And, surprise, opting out is trickier than Facebook’s typically difficult procedures. The data aggregator is Datalogix, which claims to have information about consumer transactions worth $1 trillion and about almost every U.S. household, Facebook’s Next Privacy Issue How To Opt Out.

 

The Flipside Of BitTorrent – Why Many Musicians Still Hate It

You can tell the week probably won’t go well when the first email you get on Monday morning comes from a pissed-off rock star. But when singer-songwriter David Lowery  of the band Camper Van Beethoven sent a message complaining about a previous story (BitTorrent Downloads Booming – And Benefitting Musicians), the debate was back on, The Flipside Of BitTorrent – Why Many Musicians Still Hate It.

 

5 Reasons Steve Jobs Would Have Liked His New Statue

Dumpster diving. That’s the secret behind a new sculpture of Steve Jobs. Early last year, Los Angeles artist XVALA, nee Jeff Hamilton, used trash collected from Jobs’ home to build a sculpture of the late turtle-neck and mom jeans-wearing Mac guru, complete with iPhone in hand. That’s right, the artist picked through Jobs’ trash and turned it into treasure, 5 Reasons Steve Jobs Would Have Liked His New Statue.

 

For Startups, Timing Trends Really Does Matter – Except When It Doesn’t

Now is the best time in history to start your own business. But depending on what kind of company you’re building, you have to figure out if your idea is poised to capture a trend – or doomed to miss one and face a much tougher road to success, For Startups, Timing Trends Really Does Matter – Except When It Doesn’t.

 

The Key To Social Network Success: Rip Off Pinterest?

Your social network has fallen from its 2006-era prime. You need to reposition yourself and regain the attention of users who have long since moved on. What do you do? Take a page from the Pinterest playbook. This week is apparently the week to do exactly that. First, MySpace previewed its next iteration, which moves away from traditional profiles and social streams in favor of a grid-based layout showcasing media content shared by users. Sound familiar, The Key To Social Network Success: Rip Off Pinterest?.

 

ReadWriteWeb Channels

Enterprise

Mobile

Cloud

Follow ReadWriteCloud on Twitter and join the ReadWriteCloud LinkedIn Group.

Hack

Follow ReadWriteHack on Twitter.

ReadWriteWeb Community

You can find ReadWriteWeb in many places on the web, a few of which are below.

Subscribe to the ReadWriteWeb Weekly Wrap-up

Want to have this wrap up delivered to you automagically? You can subscribe to the Weekly Wrap-up by RSS or by email.


The Document Foundation and Open Source LibreOffice Enter Year Three

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 September 2012 9:12 pm

LIbreOfficeFrom the ‘Forks That Work’ files:

Some forks die off quickly. Other linger and a precious few actually prosper and excel beyond their origins. I personally would put the LibreOffice project and its masters in the Document Foundation in the latter category.

The Document Foundation is officially celebrating its second anniversary today – hard to believe it has been two years already, isn’t it? (I know I wrote the same thing when they turned one last year!).

What has changed over the last year however is a resurgence of OpenOffice, in the form of the Apache OpenOffice project. Whereas in the first year of the Document Foundation’s life OpenOffice wasn’t all that active, the same can’t be said for the second year. Apache OpenOffice 3.4 was releasedin May marking the first new release of OpenOffice under its new leadership. That event potentially could have led to new momentum for Apache OpenOffice and a decline for LibreOffice – but that didn’t happen.

Instead, after two years and a new challenge from OpenOffice, LibreOffice has stood tall. According to the Document Foundation there have been over 20 million downloads of LibreOffice inside of the last two years.

Yeaah LibreOffice and The Document Foundation still face challenges, but they have solved a few too. LibreOffice is released with a regular cadence that provides bug and stability fixes. New feature release also have a regular cadence showing an evolutionary path for a product that previously had been going nowhere fast.

So Happy Second Anniversary Document Foundation and thank you for all your effort now and in the future.

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist. ##

Hashtags go airborne

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 September 2012 3:05 pm


(Credit:
Screenshot by CNET
)

You might not be a golf fan, and if that’s true, you probably don’t know that this weekend, the United States is facing off against Europe in the biennial Ryder Cup. You may not even know what the Ryder Cup is. But a hash tag in the sky might get your attention.

Regardless of your golf knowledge, a lot of people have been paying attention — and enjoying the Americans’ lead in the competition. But some European boosters are realizing that their heroes might need a little extra encouragement.

That’s probably why attendees on hand in Medinah, Ill., could look up into the sky today and see an unusual type of pep talk aimed at the European squad — skywriting with a Twitter hash tag: “#GOEUROPE.”

Whether the European golfers are checking out Twitter while trying to sink putts is debatable, but it’s probably nice for them to see such a thing above them.

This isn’t the first time someone’s used the sky as a backdrop for a hash-tagged message, but it could be one of the most prominent. And it would seem logical to expect to see this a lot more in the future.

Weekly Wrap-Up: Foxconn Riots, My Week With Android, And How To Buy A Smartphone

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 September 2012 8:50 am



My week with Android, or why I’m buying an iPhone 5; Foxconn riots; and how to buy a smartphone. All of this and more in the ReadWriteWeb Weekly Wrap-up.

After the jump you’ll find more of this week’s top news stories on some of the key topics that are shaping the Web – Location, App Stores and Real-Time Web – plus highlights from some of our six channels. Read on for more.

My Week With Android, Or Why I’m Buying An iPhone 5

Not long ago, one of our editors did a very bad thing: he dropped hisiPhone 4 and cracked the screen. He was very sad, but the experience proved useful as it forced him to face up to his phone future. Did he want a new iPhone 5 or was it time to switch to a different brand of smartphone, My Week With Android, Or Why I’m Buying An iPhone 5.

 

More Top Posts:

Apple Riot Aftermath: iPhone 5 Factory Remains A Powder Keg

Two days after Sunday’s riot at the Chinese Foxconn Technologies factory, the home of the Apple iPhone 5 assembly line was back up and running. But with police reportedly monitoring street corners and the factory’s main entrance, Foxconn still looks like a powder keg with a sizzling fuse, Apple Riot Aftermath: iPhone 5 Factory Remains A Powder Keg.

 

How To Buy A Smartphone: Which Is Better, Android or iPhone?

What is the difference between Android and the iPhone, really? Where do Windows Phone and BlackBerry fit in? All these platforms do basically the same thing (connect a phone to the Internet and applications), but there are fundamental differences. Determining what kind of smartphone is right for you means knowing your mobile operating systems, How To Buy A Smartphone: Which Is Better, Android or iPhone?.

 

Why I Love Apple’s Facebook Integration

The Facebook integration into Apple’s OS X and iOS brings relief. It’s the easiest, least icky, most user-friendly partnership between two major tech companies seen in a long while, and that’s saying something. The rubber has hit the road for the social Web, and it has to start making money, Why I Love Apple’s Facebook Integration.

 

Apology Accepted, Apple. Now Get To Work, Google.

When Apple showed off iOS 6 Maps in June, few could have imagined the fiasco that would ensue three months later. Indeed, the last person expecting such major fallout was CEO Tim Cook, who today issued a rare public apology. While it could have gone further, the statement was a bold move by a company not accustomed to admitting its faults, Apology Accepted, Apple. Now Get To Work, Google..

 

Facebook’s Next Privacy Issue How To Opt Out

In what is likely to become the next privacy controversy for Facebook, the social-media giant is working with a big-data firm to correlate off-line purchases with ad views on Facebook. And, surprise, opting out is trickier than Facebook’s typically difficult procedures. The data aggregator is Datalogix, which claims to have information about consumer transactions worth $1 trillion and about almost every U.S. household, Facebook’s Next Privacy Issue How To Opt Out.

 

The Flipside Of BitTorrent – Why Many Musicians Still Hate It

You can tell the week probably won’t go well when the first email you get on Monday morning comes from a pissed-off rock star. But when singer-songwriter David Lowery  of the band Camper Van Beethoven sent a message complaining about a previous story (BitTorrent Downloads Booming – And Benefitting Musicians), the debate was back on, The Flipside Of BitTorrent – Why Many Musicians Still Hate It.

 

5 Reasons Steve Jobs Would Have Liked His New Statue

Dumpster diving. That’s the secret behind a new sculpture of Steve Jobs. Early last year, Los Angeles artist XVALA, nee Jeff Hamilton, used trash collected from Jobs’ home to build a sculpture of the late turtle-neck and mom jeans-wearing Mac guru, complete with iPhone in hand. That’s right, the artist picked through Jobs’ trash and turned it into treasure, 5 Reasons Steve Jobs Would Have Liked His New Statue.

 

For Startups, Timing Trends Really Does Matter – Except When It Doesn’t

Now is the best time in history to start your own business. But depending on what kind of company you’re building, you have to figure out if your idea is poised to capture a trend – or doomed to miss one and face a much tougher road to success, For Startups, Timing Trends Really Does Matter – Except When It Doesn’t.

 

The Key To Social Network Success: Rip Off Pinterest?

Your social network has fallen from its 2006-era prime. You need to reposition yourself and regain the attention of users who have long since moved on. What do you do? Take a page from the Pinterest playbook. This week is apparently the week to do exactly that. First, MySpace previewed its next iteration, which moves away from traditional profiles and social streams in favor of a grid-based layout showcasing media content shared by users. Sound familiar, The Key To Social Network Success: Rip Off Pinterest?.

 

ReadWriteWeb Channels

Enterprise

Mobile

Cloud

Follow ReadWriteCloud on Twitter and join the ReadWriteCloud LinkedIn Group.

Hack

Follow ReadWriteHack on Twitter.

ReadWriteWeb Community

You can find ReadWriteWeb in many places on the web, a few of which are below.

Subscribe to the ReadWriteWeb Weekly Wrap-up

Want to have this wrap up delivered to you automagically? You can subscribe to the Weekly Wrap-up by RSS or by email.


The Document Foundation and Open Source LibreOffice Enter Year Three

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 September 2012 2:49 am

LIbreOfficeFrom the ‘Forks That Work’ files:

Some forks die off quickly. Other linger and a precious few actually prosper and excel beyond their origins. I personally would put the LibreOffice project and its masters in the Document Foundation in the latter category.

The Document Foundation is officially celebrating its second anniversary today – hard to believe it has been two years already, isn’t it? (I know I wrote the same thing when they turned one last year!).

What has changed over the last year however is a resurgence of OpenOffice, in the form of the Apache OpenOffice project. Whereas in the first year of the Document Foundation’s life OpenOffice wasn’t all that active, the same can’t be said for the second year. Apache OpenOffice 3.4 was releasedin May marking the first new release of OpenOffice under its new leadership. That event potentially could have led to new momentum for Apache OpenOffice and a decline for LibreOffice – but that didn’t happen.

Instead, after two years and a new challenge from OpenOffice, LibreOffice has stood tall. According to the Document Foundation there have been over 20 million downloads of LibreOffice inside of the last two years.

Yeaah LibreOffice and The Document Foundation still face challenges, but they have solved a few too. LibreOffice is released with a regular cadence that provides bug and stability fixes. New feature release also have a regular cadence showing an evolutionary path for a product that previously had been going nowhere fast.

So Happy Second Anniversary Document Foundation and thank you for all your effort now and in the future.

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist. ##

European luxury and sport at the 2012 Paris Motor Show (roundup)

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 28 September 2012 8:10 pm

PARIS – These may be trying times for the European economy, but that automakers rallied at the 2012 Paris Motor Show, bringing out a variety of new concepts and some model updates relevant to the U.S. buyer. As has become a theme given European interest in CO2 reduction, many of the
cars we saw featured hybrid or electric drivetrains. And many new models and updates were what we in the U.S. consider premium cars boasting fine coachwork.

Here is our last day round-up from the 2012 Paris Motor Show.



(Credit:
Wayne Cunningham/CNET
)

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo concept

Porsche showed off a new concept at the 2012 Paris Motor Show, a shooting-brake-style car with a plug-in hybrid drive system. With less of a bubble butt than the production Panamera, it will likely still invite controversy.



(Credit:
Antuan Goodwin/CNET
)

Mini Cooper Paceman

Mini reshuffles its Countryman crossover to create its seventh new model, the Mini Paceman sports activity coupe.

2013 Range Rover

(Credit:
Wayne Cunningham/CNET
)

Range Rover

The Range Rover got a much needed update for 2013, which debuted at the 2012 Paris Motor Show. The newest version of the old warhorse goes to a lightweight aluminum body while keeping its powerful engine and off-road capability.



(Credit:
Antuan Goodwin/CNET
)

Honda CR-Z

Honda’s hybrid sports coupe gets a bit more power and a new S+ feature that behaves like an electric nitrous boost.


McLaren P1


(Credit:
Wayne Cunningham/CNET
)

McLaren P1 concept

McLaren, known for its innovative sports car the MP412C, unveils its next two-seat racer, the McLaren P1. CNET’s Wayne Cunningham takes a look at the concept car and gives us his thoughts at the 2012 Paris Motor Show.

Nissan Terra SUV concept

(Credit:
Wayne Cunningham/CNET
)

Concept car gallery

This year’s Paris Motor Show featured quite a few concepts, design studies from major automakers featuring new technologies such as electric drive systems.

And if you want to take in the entire show in what photo gallery, visit our Paris Motor Show mega gallery, with all the new cars along with some other sights from the show floor.

Click here for full coverage of the 2012 Paris Motor Show.

Digg For iPad Lets You Pick Up Reading Where You Left Off

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 28 September 2012 1:27 pm

The nimble Betaworks team behind the new Digg has just released a new version of its iOS app that supports the iPad. It also adds a handy feature called “reading sync,” which syncs your scrolling position in an article between the iPhone and iPad, so you can pick up where you left off. You can now share article links via text message, and the navigation in the app has been simplified.

The Digg app is still very simple, but the experience is remarkably consistent with the desktop Web version, which has been scaled back a bit to match its iOS siblings. It’s a very basic grid of stories with an image and tag line, and there’s one number indicating social network buzz.

But this team, which first built social news app News.me, has become known for packing small but awesome features underneath simple exteriors. The save-for-later functionality in Digg for iOS is now bolstered by reading sync, making reading on Digg a convenient cross-device experience. It also features News.me’s pioneering Paperboy feature, which refreshes your article list whenever you leave or arrive at a location of your choice.


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