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10 Music Services You May Not Know About—But Should

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 30 June 2013 11:41 pm

Yes, Twitter has a #music service now, and iTunes Radio is all shiny and new. But forget about them for a moment. In fact, forget about Pandora, Spotify, Rdio and Slacker. Same for Grooveshark, Vevo, Rhapsody, MOG, last.fm, Soundcloud, Deezer and Songza.

While we’re at it, please—oh please—forget about listening to music on YouTube. Just take a moment and clear your mental cache.

It’s not that these services are bad. In fact, I love many of them. But sometimes we get stuck in familiar routines. Every now and then we need to press pause and see what else is out there. It’s good for us. We might find something new (or better) that we would’ve never known about otherwise.

So whether you’re simply a music junkie, or you want to enhance or supplement a service you already use, or you just love staying on the bleeding edge or relish living outside of the mainstream, take a moment to discover a few great music services. Most—maybe all—of which I’m betting you’ve never heard of before.

exfm

Exfm is all about creating a music feed chock full of songs you love. It works like this: Create a profile and click on the heart icon when you hear a song you really like. It’s basically that simple.

On the music discovery side, you can follow other people to hear what they loved and or check what’s trending to tap into the community pulse. Additionally, the Exfm team hand-picks featured music on a daily basis to give you a professionally curated source of fresh tunes to explore.

One fun and unique feature also lets you follow your favorite music blogs—and discover new ones.

Lisnr

Lisnr offers you a way to get more from your music—more goodies, more special offers, more whatever. Using the app, you can scan audio (live or recorded) for a special frequency that only Lisnr can recognize. Artists can use the service to deliver perks and bonuses to their fans.

If Lisnr detects the appropriate frequency, your phone will display a notification signaling the arrival of bonus tracks, discounts on live-show tickets, or some other exclusive.

Rapper J. Cole, for instance, recently gave fans early access to his latest album by holding “listening parties” whose locations could only be unearthed via Lisnr. Unwrap and enjoy your extras.

rara

If the idea of advertising-free unlimited music streaming (with access to 17 million tracks) for only 99¢ per month tickles your fancy, you’re going to want to give rara a try.

Ready-made playlists and stations put together by music experts? Check. The ability to take your music with you on the go (even on a Windows 8 device) and access it offline (through an app that costs $1.99)? Check and check.

You might consider this a decent Spotify alternative if you’re looking for something even cheaper.

Murfie

Murfie has found a way to squeeze a little extra juice out of the compact disc by merging a marketplace to buy CDs for $1-2 with streaming and downloads.

Every interaction on the site is based on a real CD that you own and can “do whatever you want with.” Since everything is based on physical CDs, Murfie will help you add the first 100 discs from your home collection for free.

Murfie gives you lossless downloads (FLAC and ALAC) and allows you to trade albums with other members—at zero cost.

Serendip

Serendip (which derives its name from “an aptitude for making desirable discoveries by accident) bills itself as a social music discovery service.

If you prefer a lean-back approach to music (as opposed to picking every single song you want to listen to) then Serendip may be a great fit. It can connect you with people who share your musical taste and generates an automatic playlist based on music both you and they are enjoying.

Stereomood

The concept behind Stereomood is simple: Turn your mood into music. Pre-selected moods range from Happy to Studying to Just Woke Up to Lost In Jamaica.

Up at the top of the site is a big search box where you can type what you are feeling to quickly get matched to a particular playlist. What’s nice about Stereomood is that the songs are all aggregated from the best music blogs across the Internet.

Meaning that you could discover the next big thing at any time.

Playground.fm

Playground.fm is an app that aims to transform your favorite songs into “the perfect musical mix” to provide a simple, beautiful and, perhaps most importantly, free listening experience.

This playlist-based music service was born out of the founders’ desire to use awesome playlists without necessarily having to create awesome playlists. If you, like the founders, feel that “popular is boring,” you may want to give it a try.

8tracks

8tracks can easily be described as internet radio created by people, not algorithms.

True to its name, 8tracks lets you create mixtapes with 8 or more tracks (to which you add a title, cover art and tags) that you can then share with with friends. When you first land on the site you are presented with some basic categories to get you started—like chill, party or indie rock, for instance.

If you want free music to go, check out the iOS and Android apps.

seevl

Seevl combines an algorithm with a search platform to help you find new music.

Seevl currently works with Deezer and YouTube and is the product of years of research and development at the intersection of social and semantic web technologies. Like other music services, seevl centers around a dashboard/profile that you create and builds recommendations from there.

MPme radio

MPme gives you real-time, live radio station recommendations matched to your taste. It brings its own unique twist to the curated playlist.

MPme provides you with access to high-quality, “pro” playlists already on the airwaves. If you own more than one device you can sync them via Facebook integration.

Apple reportedly applies for ‘iWatch’ trademark in Japan

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Sunday 30 June 2013 5:39 pm

Which watch?


(Credit:
CNET)

Apple apparently likes how the “iWatch” moniker fits a wearable computer and has reportedly applied for a trademark for the name in Japan.

The iPhone maker seeks to protect the name for a product that is categorized as a handheld computer or watch device, according to a filing earlier this month with the Japan Patent Office. The filing was only made public in the past week, according to Bloomberg, which first reported on the application.

The rumor mill adopted the name — perhaps derisively mocking Apple’s “iProduct” naming convention — when reports emerged that the company was developing a smartwatch that would run on its iOS mobile operating system. Employees from Apple’s marketing, software, and hardware units who had previously worked on the iPhone and
iPad are reportedly part of a team numbering more than 100 experimenting with wristwatch-like devices that sport curved glass.

Interest in wearable computers has swelled in recent months with the developer release of
Google Glass. Apple rival Google is reportedly developing a smartwatch that runs Android, and Samsung has indicated that it has long been interested in producing a smartwatch. Microsoft is reportedly studying the idea.

Rumors of Apple working on just such a device have been circulating for months. A report from a Chinese blog last December held that Apple had partnered with Intel to develop an iOS wristwatch that would be Bluetooth-enabled and sport a 1.5-inch OLED screen.

The smart wristwatch notion isn’t exactly groundbreaking: a lot of smartwatches, fitness bands, or some hybrid of the two, were talked up earlier this year at the Consumer Electronics Show. Some of those devices include the long-awaited Pebble wristwatch, which made its debut at the conference, and the 007-inspired Martian Passport Watch.

CNET has contacted Apple for comment and will update this report when we learn more.

Instagram Video May Be Strangling Vine Now, But This Fight Is Far From Over

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 June 2013 10:48 am

The Twitter-owned microvideo service Vine has had better days. Earlier, Marketing Land revealed that user sharing of six-second Vine videos plummeted after Instagram debuted a competing service last week. But Vine isn’t Internet roadkill quite yet.

Marketing Land conjured data from Twitter-metric firm Topsy, comparing how many times people shared instagram.com links on Twitter against the frequency of vine.co links. Its most stunning revelation: Sharing of Vine videos dropped by almost 40% on June 20, the day Instagram launched its video service. So far, there’s no turnaround in sight.

Some other notable findings:

  • On June 15, users shared almost 3 million Vine links.
  • On June 19, Topsy reported 2.5 million shares of Vine videos.
  • On June 20, that figured plunged to 1.5 million.
  • On June 27, Vine sharing dipped below 900,000.

Instagram sharing on Twitter has also edged up as Vine’s has waned, according to the Topsy data. Instagram sharing spiked by almost 250,000 links—a 17% jump —on June 20. Once that surge dissipated, Instagram sharing fell back significantly, but remained at a level slightly higher than the service had seen for much of the previous month. 

Another telling way of thinking about all this: As of yesterday, users were sharing twice as many Instagram links as Vine links, whereas on June 15 the reverse was true. (Recall that Instagram sharing includes photos—Instagram’s mainstay prior to June 20—as well as video.)

Twitter, which hadn’t responded to my request for comment as of publication, is clearly aware of Vine’s predicament. Just this morning, in fact, Twitter sent out a mass email promoting Vine this morning—almost as if the company was eager to rekindle the interest of users who might be tempted away by Instagram.

(See Twitter’s Vine promo below and to the right.)

Where Vine Goes From Here

Although Twitter released Vine for Android earlier this month and recently added support for the front-facing camera, those moves clearly haven’t been enough to retain user interest over the past week. 

The first thing Vine can do? Don’t panic. 

“Instagram still has the novelty factor,” social media strategist Mari Smith told me. “All [Vine] may need to do is stay the course.”

Technology in general—and social media in particular—is a tumultuous industry. If companies freaked out every time the metrics rose or fell, heart attacks would be the new rite of passage for Silicon Valley execs.

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo seems to have taken that advice to heart. On Wednesday, he told an audience in Washington that he’s not worried about competition from Instagram:

Other people can replicate that or take pieces of it if that’s what they want to do…. If we do what we want to do, and go where we want to go, we don’t have to worry about what that guy’s doing over there.

Vine, though, could definitely use a dramatic move to recapture the initiative. Twitter has already tipped that it has some “exciting new parts of Vine” to announce this summer. That’s a good start; the stakes for that rollout are now considerably higher than they were just two weeks ago.

Whatever Twitter does, it’s now clear that it is really at war with Facebook. Both services are vying to establish themselves as preeminent repositories, or “sinks,” for the vast numbers of photos, video and status updates their users generate.

(See also Twitter’s Vine App Officially Comes To Android)

And they’re getting increasingly petty about inconveniencing their own users when it suits their business interests. Twitter, for instance, will display Vine videos directly within tweets, but forces users to click away to see Instagram video. Facebook, coincidentally enough, plays Instagram video directly within newsfeeds, but will only allow links to Vine videos.

We’ve reached out to Twitter for comment. So far, no word yet, but we’ll update this post if they respond. 

Instagram Video May Be Strangling Vine Now, But This Fight Is Far From Over

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 June 2013 10:48 am

The Twitter-owned microvideo service Vine has had better days. Earlier, Marketing Land revealed that user sharing of six-second Vine videos plummeted after Instagram debuted a competing service last week. But Vine isn’t Internet roadkill quite yet.

Marketing Land conjured data from Twitter-metric firm Topsy, comparing how many times people shared instagram.com links on Twitter against the frequency of vine.co links. Its most stunning revelation: Sharing of Vine videos dropped by almost 40% on June 20, the day Instagram launched its video service. So far, there’s no turnaround in sight.

Some other notable findings:

  • On June 15, users shared almost 3 million Vine links.
  • On June 19, Topsy reported 2.5 million shares of Vine videos.
  • On June 20, that figured plunged to 1.5 million.
  • On June 27, Vine sharing dipped below 900,000.

Instagram sharing on Twitter has also edged up as Vine’s has waned, according to the Topsy data. Instagram sharing spiked by almost 250,000 links—a 17% jump —on June 20. Once that surge dissipated, Instagram sharing fell back significantly, but remained at a level slightly higher than the service had seen for much of the previous month. 

Another telling way of thinking about all this: As of yesterday, users were sharing twice as many Instagram links as Vine links, whereas on June 15 the reverse was true. (Recall that Instagram sharing includes photos—Instagram’s mainstay prior to June 20—as well as video.)

Twitter, which hadn’t responded to my request for comment as of publication, is clearly aware of Vine’s predicament. Just this morning, in fact, Twitter sent out a mass email promoting Vine this morning—almost as if the company was eager to rekindle the interest of users who might be tempted away by Instagram.

(See Twitter’s Vine promo below and to the right.)

Where Vine Goes From Here

Although Twitter released Vine for Android earlier this month and recently added support for the front-facing camera, those moves clearly haven’t been enough to retain user interest over the past week. 

The first thing Vine can do? Don’t panic. 

“Instagram still has the novelty factor,” social media strategist Mari Smith told me. “All [Vine] may need to do is stay the course.”

Technology in general—and social media in particular—is a tumultuous industry. If companies freaked out every time the metrics rose or fell, heart attacks would be the new rite of passage for Silicon Valley execs.

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo seems to have taken that advice to heart. On Wednesday, he told an audience in Washington that he’s not worried about competition from Instagram:

Other people can replicate that or take pieces of it if that’s what they want to do…. If we do what we want to do, and go where we want to go, we don’t have to worry about what that guy’s doing over there.

Vine, though, could definitely use a dramatic move to recapture the initiative. Twitter has already tipped that it has some “exciting new parts of Vine” to announce this summer. That’s a good start; the stakes for that rollout are now considerably higher than they were just two weeks ago.

Whatever Twitter does, it’s now clear that it is really at war with Facebook. Both services are vying to establish themselves as preeminent repositories, or “sinks,” for the vast numbers of photos, video and status updates their users generate.

(See also Twitter’s Vine App Officially Comes To Android)

And they’re getting increasingly petty about inconveniencing their own users when it suits their business interests. Twitter, for instance, will display Vine videos directly within tweets, but forces users to click away to see Instagram video. Facebook, coincidentally enough, plays Instagram video directly within newsfeeds, but will only allow links to Vine videos.

We’ve reached out to Twitter for comment. So far, no word yet, but we’ll update this post if they respond. 

Instagram Video May Be Strangling Vine Now, But This Fight Is Far From Over

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 June 2013 10:48 am

The Twitter-owned microvideo service Vine has had better days. Earlier, Marketing Land revealed that user sharing of six-second Vine videos plummeted after Instagram debuted a competing service last week. But Vine isn’t Internet roadkill quite yet.

Marketing Land conjured data from Twitter-metric firm Topsy, comparing how many times people shared instagram.com links on Twitter against the frequency of vine.co links. Its most stunning revelation: Sharing of Vine videos dropped by almost 40% on June 20, the day Instagram launched its video service. So far, there’s no turnaround in sight.

Some other notable findings:

  • On June 15, users shared almost 3 million Vine links.
  • On June 19, Topsy reported 2.5 million shares of Vine videos.
  • On June 20, that figured plunged to 1.5 million.
  • On June 27, Vine sharing dipped below 900,000.

Instagram sharing on Twitter has also edged up as Vine’s has waned, according to the Topsy data. Instagram sharing spiked by almost 250,000 links—a 17% jump —on June 20. Once that surge dissipated, Instagram sharing fell back significantly, but remained at a level slightly higher than the service had seen for much of the previous month. 

Another telling way of thinking about all this: As of yesterday, users were sharing twice as many Instagram links as Vine links, whereas on June 15 the reverse was true. (Recall that Instagram sharing includes photos—Instagram’s mainstay prior to June 20—as well as video.)

Twitter, which hadn’t responded to my request for comment as of publication, is clearly aware of Vine’s predicament. Just this morning, in fact, Twitter sent out a mass email promoting Vine this morning—almost as if the company was eager to rekindle the interest of users who might be tempted away by Instagram.

(See Twitter’s Vine promo below and to the right.)

Where Vine Goes From Here

Although Twitter released Vine for Android earlier this month and recently added support for the front-facing camera, those moves clearly haven’t been enough to retain user interest over the past week. 

The first thing Vine can do? Don’t panic. 

“Instagram still has the novelty factor,” social media strategist Mari Smith told me. “All [Vine] may need to do is stay the course.”

Technology in general—and social media in particular—is a tumultuous industry. If companies freaked out every time the metrics rose or fell, heart attacks would be the new rite of passage for Silicon Valley execs.

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo seems to have taken that advice to heart. On Wednesday, he told an audience in Washington that he’s not worried about competition from Instagram:

Other people can replicate that or take pieces of it if that’s what they want to do…. If we do what we want to do, and go where we want to go, we don’t have to worry about what that guy’s doing over there.

Vine, though, could definitely use a dramatic move to recapture the initiative. Twitter has already tipped that it has some “exciting new parts of Vine” to announce this summer. That’s a good start; the stakes for that rollout are now considerably higher than they were just two weeks ago.

Whatever Twitter does, it’s now clear that it is really at war with Facebook. Both services are vying to establish themselves as preeminent repositories, or “sinks,” for the vast numbers of photos, video and status updates their users generate.

(See also Twitter’s Vine App Officially Comes To Android)

And they’re getting increasingly petty about inconveniencing their own users when it suits their business interests. Twitter, for instance, will display Vine videos directly within tweets, but forces users to click away to see Instagram video. Facebook, coincidentally enough, plays Instagram video directly within newsfeeds, but will only allow links to Vine videos.

We’ve reached out to Twitter for comment. So far, no word yet, but we’ll update this post if they respond. 

Trayvon Martin trial spawns insensitive Instagram from defense lawyer’s daughter

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 29 June 2013 4:41 am

Is this the kind of stupidity that defeats you, too?


(Credit:
Molly Westttt/Instagram)

If you happen to be involved in a trial that has severe racial overtones, you should perhaps know that mockery might not be the most appropriate mode of expression.

Don West, lawyer for George Zimmerman — the man accused of murdering Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. — began his client’s defense with a knock-knock joke, so perhaps the stage was already set for a different sort of theater.

You might imagine, though, that if you’re a West family member, you’d temper your need to, say, leap to your favored social network to add to that mockery, with even further racial overtones.

And yet one of West’s daughters couldn’t resist going to her “MollyWestttt” Instagram account to post a sweet family image that packed something of a sidewinder.

As BuzzFeed reports, the image was charming: a father and his two daughters with their cones of soft ice cream.

The caption accompanying the image was a little less soft: “We beat stupidity celebration cones … #zimmerman #defense #dadkilledit.”

You might think it borders on the coarse to suggest a murder trial lawyer “killed” anything. You might, moreover, wonder what “we beat stupidity” might refer to.

Well, West spent much of the week trying to disturb the equilibrium of Martin’s friend Rachel Jeantel.

It wouldn’t be hard to infer that Molly West’s Instagram caption suggests that Jeantal — who happens to be black — represents “stupidity.”

The Miami Herald’s Evan Benn reports that West told him: “We’re not always proud of things our children do, but we love them anyway, and then we move on.”

Perhaps that also includes not being proud of what our children think, too. But I wonder what West might have said, before and after the Instagram picture, to his daughter — who is reportedly “mortified.”

A West spokesperson also told Benn: “We understand the context of the comments with what’s happened in court this week are grossly insensitive.”

There are increasing instances of certain people from certain generations not understanding (or caring) about what they inject into the public eye, whether it’s on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook.

One father blames just such a (couldn’t) careless attitude for his son facing 8 years in jail after posting a Facebook joke about shooting and eating schoolchildren.

The habit of publishing one’s every thought, act, and feeling is becoming so ingrained that it is often regarded as merely “normal.”

To Molly West it might well have seemed entirely normal to post that image with those words: Other people should, of course, know what she’s really feeling and thinking (that’s, like, what social networks are for, right?).

But regardless of what you might think happened on the day George Zimmerman shot Trayvon Martin, how can you not wonder what went through the head of Molly West? How can you not wonder whether her sentiments are shared by her father?

It’s hard not to conclude that she did, indeed, defeat stupidity.

For even stupidity stood there and couldn’t believe what she was saying and doing.

Puppet Enterprise 3.0 Pulls the Strings on Software Defined Infrastructure

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 28 June 2013 10:40 pm

This week Puppet Labs accelerated the drive toward full Software-Defined Infrastructure (SDI( with the release of Puppet Enterprise 3.0. The latest release of Puppet Enterprise adds new cloud and network orchestration capabilities that go beyond what had been available in the Puppet Enterprise 2.5 release that debuted in 2012.

Luc Kanies, CEO and founder of Puppet Labs, explained to ServerWatch that he still comes across enterprises where there is an individual that walks around with a clipboard trying to determine what the status is of connected infrastructure.

“Modern infrastructure and especially cloud technology is very dynamic and transient, so it might be that a workload is running today on a machine that simply won’t exist tomorrow,” Kanies said. “What you need is to have a system that is based on dynamic discovery.”

Read the full story at ServerWatch:
Puppet Enterprise 3 Orchestrates Configuration

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Open Source FreeBSD Co-Founder Leaving Apple

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 28 June 2013 4:51 am

beastieFrom the ‘Think Different Be a Beastie’ files:

Jordan Hubbard, the open source developer that helped to co-found the FreeBSD Project back in 1993 is leaving Apple.

Hubbard had been at Apple since 2001 and his most recent title was the Director of UNIX Technology. Mac OS X after all has strong roots in FreeBSD and Hubbard’s employment at Apple was a key part of that.

Hubbard is now set to join iXsystems as CTO effective July 15th. iXsystems is a long time supporter and advocate of FreeBSD.

I’m very excited to have this opportunity to help guide iXsystems through its next phase of professional and technological development,” Hubbard said in a statement. “This is not just a great opportunity for me to be part of a company known for its strong support of FreeBSD and other open source software, but I’m also looking forward to helping it achieve new levels of success with the TrueNAS storage appliance and having the opportunity to create future innovative products.”

So what does this mean for Apple?

Likely not a whole lot. Apple is not likely to stray too far from Mac OS X’s BSD core. Then again Apple’s core focus lately is all about mobile, which seems to influence the desktop now more than the other way around.

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Oracle And Salesforce Bury The Hatchet—Surprisingly, Not In The Others’ Back

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 27 June 2013 9:51 pm

Oracle And Salesforce Bury The Hatchet—Surprisingly, Not In The Others' Back

Say this for Larry Ellison. He can sometimes shoot off his mouth and piss people off, but when things get tough, he’ll do whatever it takes to push Oracle forward and set things right for his company.

That may be biggest takeaway from Oracle’s just-announced alliance with hated rival Salesforce.com, a nine-year partnership that will put Salesforce.com’s cloud-based customer-management software atop Oracle apps and infrastructure. That includes using Exadata systems, Oracle’s database, Oracle’s Java middleware and Oracle Enterprise Linux.

This partnership may be the clearest sign yet that Oracle is under intense pressure from customers who are more interested in “alternative” but fast-growing database-related technologies such as non-relational NoSQL databases and commodity storage like Hadoop.

The success of those technologies is probably the number one reason that this deal happened in the first place. The world is not a friendly place for companies like Oracle anymore, and it needs friends wherever it can find them. Even if that means turning to companies it’s long poked with sharp sticks, like Salesforce and Microsoft (with whom it struck a related sort of partnership earlier this week).

Ellison had been promising a big announcement that would blow away the tech community. Many observers, including me, regarded this as so much Ellison jive, especially after the “big” Oracle-Microsoft partnership turned out to be little more than Oracle databases running on the Windows Azure cloud service. In this case, we were way off the mark.

I Now Pronounce You Marc Larry

That's Larry on the leftThat’s Larry on the left

Today’s announcement is the real deal: two huge cloud and data service providers who have been sniping at each other professionally for years setting those differences aside and getting a deal done.

But to actually see it happen, to hear Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff actually say nice things about Oracle’s services after so many public potshots was just, well, weird.

For Oracle, this is a good deal all around. It needed a big boost to showcase its database and cloud offerings, which were increasingly being eclipsed by the white-hot spotlight shining on Hadoop, NoSQL and other big data technologies.

The fact that Oracle will be using Saleforce.com as its customer relation management (CRM) platform could be the biggest benefit for Salesforce.com. That in itself is a pretty big deal, especially after Oracle bought Siebel, then the world’s biggest CRM company, back in 2005.

One thing is for sure—Ellison must have cut Benioff one hell of a deal.

Army admits restricting soldiers’ access to NSA coverage

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 27 June 2013 3:50 pm

The U.S. Army has opted to restrict Army personnel access to The Guardian’s Web site after the newspaper broke stories about the National Security Agency’s confidential surveillance activities.

The Army is filtering “some access to press coverage and online content about the NSA leaks,” Gordon Van Vleet, a spokesman for the Army Network Enterprise Technology Command, told the Monterey Herald. NETCOM is charged with operating and defending the Army’s computer networks.

Van Vleet told the Herald that the Department of Defense routinely takes preventative “network hygiene” measures to prevent unauthorized disclosure of classified information.

“We make every effort to balance the need to preserve information access with operational security,” he wrote, “however there are strict policies and directives in place regarding protecting and handling classified information.”

Despite earlier reports that the restrictions were limited to the Presidio in Monterey, Van Vleet confirmed that the censorship was “Armywide.” Presidio sources told the Herald that the base’s information assurance security officer had informed employees that The Guardian’s site had been blocked and any accidental download of classified information would result in “labor intensive” hard drive cleansing.

CNET has contacted NETCOM for comment and additional information and will update this report when we learn more.

A pair of articles published earlier this month by The Guardian and Washington Post alleged that several Internet companies, including Google, Apple, Yahoo, Microsoft, and Facebook, provided the NSA with “direct access” to their servers through a so-called PRISM program. Subsequent reporting by CNET revealed that this was not the case, and the Washington Post backtracked from its original story on PRISM.

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