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Google Chrome 29 Update Fixes 25 Flaws

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 August 2013 2:38 pm

How much does it cost to patch 25 flaws in an open-source Web browser?

Google is updating the stable version of its Chrome browser to version 29.0.1547.57 across the Windows, Mac and Linux operating system platforms. The new update includes at least 25 security fixes as well as an improved Omnibox search capability and a new browser reset feature.

Read the full story at eWeek:
Google Chrome 29 Update Fixes 25 Flaws, CloudFuzzer Is Big Winner

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

In Battle With Twitter, Facebook Tests Trending Topics Feature

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 August 2013 2:37 pm

Just two months after rolling out hashtags—topics formatted with a “#” sign, first popularized on Twitter—Facebook is taking another leaf out of its rival’s playbook and testing a trending topics section on select users’ news feeds, the Wall Street Journal reports

ReadWrite confirmed that the new feature is showing for at least one employee:

Hashtags on Twitter act as a way for users to participate in and monitor conversations, and it looks like Facebook wants its users to have a similar experience. The trending topics section that began testing on Thursday will appear on a user’s homepage news feed and will feature popular topics being discussed on the site.

Unlike Twitter, Facebook is not using the “#” sign. Instead, it appears to be interpreting and collecting users’ posts on a subject together regardless of whether they use explicit hashtags or relevant keywords.

Facebook began testing the trending topics feature on its mobile website earlier this month.

Leaked documents detail broad reach of US cyberoperations

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 August 2013 8:32 am

NSA chief General Keith Alexander takes prepared audience questions from Black Hat general manager Trey Ford at Black Hat 2013. The NSA’s secret budget is part of the latest documents leaked by Edward Snowden to the Washington Post.


(Credit:
Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

This week’s round of NSA spying revelations involved new documents leaked by Edward Snowden revealing US spy agencies’ proposed $52 billion “black budget” for 2013. But The Washington Post has delved even further into those documents to show exactly how those hefty funds can be put into action.

In 2011, US spy agencies carried out 231 offensive cyberattacks, primarily targeted at Iran, Russia, North Korea, and China, The Washington Post reported Friday.

The Post also revealed that under a $652 million project called “Genie,” US agencies broke into foreign computer networks, placing “covert implants” on “tens of thousands of machines every year.” What’s more, US intelligence services intend to broaden those numbers into the millions.

One of the most high-profile examples of an offensive cyberoperation is Stuxnet, a sophisticated computer virus, believed to have been created by the US and Israel, that was used to attack a nuclear enrichment facility in Iran in 2010.

Leaked documents detail broad reach of US cyberoperations

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 August 2013 8:32 am

NSA chief General Keith Alexander takes prepared audience questions from Black Hat general manager Trey Ford at Black Hat 2013. The NSA’s secret budget is part of the latest documents leaked by Edward Snowden to the Washington Post.


(Credit:
Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

This week’s round of NSA spying revelations involved new documents leaked by Edward Snowden revealing US spy agencies’ proposed $52 billion “black budget” for 2013. But The Washington Post has delved even further into those documents to show exactly how those hefty funds can be put into action.

In 2011, US spy agencies carried out 231 offensive cyberattacks, primarily targeted at Iran, Russia, North Korea, and China, The Washington Post reported Friday.

The Post also revealed that under a $652 million project called “Genie,” US agencies broke into foreign computer networks, placing “covert implants” on “tens of thousands of machines every year.” What’s more, US intelligence services intend to broaden those numbers into the millions.

One of the most high-profile examples of an offensive cyberoperation is Stuxnet, a sophisticated computer virus, believed to have been created by the US and Israel, that was used to attack a nuclear enrichment facility in Iran in 2010.

Leaked documents detail broad reach of US cyberoperations

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Saturday 31 August 2013 8:32 am

NSA chief General Keith Alexander takes prepared audience questions from Black Hat general manager Trey Ford at Black Hat 2013. The NSA’s secret budget is part of the latest documents leaked by Edward Snowden to the Washington Post.


(Credit:
Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

This week’s round of NSA spying revelations involved new documents leaked by Edward Snowden revealing US spy agencies’ proposed $52 billion “black budget” for 2013. But The Washington Post has delved even further into those documents to show exactly how those hefty funds can be put into action.

In 2011, US spy agencies carried out 231 offensive cyberattacks, primarily targeted at Iran, Russia, North Korea, and China, The Washington Post reported Friday.

The Post also revealed that under a $652 million project called “Genie,” US agencies broke into foreign computer networks, placing “covert implants” on “tens of thousands of machines every year.” What’s more, US intelligence services intend to broaden those numbers into the millions.

One of the most high-profile examples of an offensive cyberoperation is Stuxnet, a sophisticated computer virus, believed to have been created by the US and Israel, that was used to attack a nuclear enrichment facility in Iran in 2010.

EA’s All-Too-Familiar SimCity Woes Return On Mac

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Friday 30 August 2013 1:55 am

EA's All-Too-Familiar SimCity Woes Return On Mac

It’s time for act two of the SimCity launch failure theater. 

When publisher Electronic Arts launched SimCity for Windows in March, the release could only be described as disastrous. So bad, in fact, that EA made the “difficult decision” to postpone SimCity for Mac until August 29.

However, the delay may not have been long enough. EA’s forums are currently crowded with players who can’t seem to get the game to play on Mac computers. A number of players wrote that pressing the “Install” button does nothing. Others claim that the game doesn’t play on earlier versions of Mac OS, despite EA’s claims to the opposite. 

“We’re aware some [of] our Mac Mayors are experiencing a few bumps in the road,” the official SimCity account tweeted, linking to a developing FAQ based on users’ expanding laundry list of difficulties simply installing the game. 

“Oh my, so nearly 6 months later and you still haven’t got a fully functional working game yet? Diabolical,” one Twitter user responded

While this failure to launch certainly looks familiar, the problems Mac users are experiencing are completely different from the server errors Windows users faced back in March. Unlike previous iterations of the popular urban planning simulation, the March release of SimCity could only be accessed while the gamer was connected to a server. The one big problem: only a fraction of players could access EA’s servers.

See also Will SimCity Launch Disaster Stop Online-Only DRM?

The server issues have been fixed in the six months since launch, but Mac users might not even get a chance to use them given the high rate of installation errors. Even more problematic: while EA is addressing the installation errors, it so far hasn’t commented on user claims that, once the game is running, it looks terrible.

It’s a continuing streak of bad luck for SimCity, which had early critics and reviewers speaking its praises before launch day, and then quickly docking their review scores. Electronic Arts can make the best game in the world, but it’s useless if users can’t play it, much less get it to install. 

 

Image courtesy of Electronic Arts. 

Bentley Continental GT Speed: A 205 mph love letter to the past

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 29 August 2013 7:55 pm

At the birth of the automotive era a few companies began to carve out their own niche, an area of the industry in which they wanted to make their mark. For Bentley that was the performance racing car.

With wins at Le Mans in 1924, 1927, 1928, 1929, and 1930 and a reputation for some of the most exciting machines on four wheel the future of Bentley seemed to be bright. The late twenties however brought with it the Great Depression and sales dwindled. As complete collapse seemed imminent a bail out in the form a purchase by British Central Equitable Trust gave hope that Bentley would live on to grow into the racing legend it so deserved to be. It quickly became apparent, however, that this had been a front. Rolls-Royce had, under the guise of a fake company, now bought out Bentley, which it had began to see as a rival.

For the next 70 years Bentley was relegated to selling Rolls-Royce
cars by another name and everything that the company had stood for faded into distant memory.

After the purchase of Bentley by the VW group in the late ’90s, there was hope again. The first car to be developed by the new, freer Bentley was the Continental GT. After a great reception, sales for Bentley went though the roof. The Continental GT acted as a bridge between the stately luxury of the Rolls-Royce-era Bentleys and the exciting racing cars of the ’20s.

Development of the Continental GT has continued since its original release in 2003 and now the fastest-ever production car Bentley has ever produced has been added to the lineup: the Continental GT Speed. With a top speed of 205 mph, it certainly lives up to its name. We had the chance to take the car out for a spin on a soaking-wet Autobahn in Germany, the only place the GT Speed can truly stretch its legs.

In normal drive mode the car eats up the road as you would expect from a luxury GT: fast, comfortable, and quiet. The new eight-speed ZF gearbox allows high-speed cruising at relatively low revs and makes for a fantastic ride as the Bavarian countryside flies by. Put it in sport mode, however, and a little bit more control, although not all, is given back to the driver, along with the responsibility to use it wisely. Now that gearbox which allowed you to cruise so quietly can drop from eighth gear to third gear in the blink of an eye and thrust you back into your seat in a fashion that would cause an owner of a Roller to lose his lunch. Feeling the back end twitch as you corner at 130 mph on a crowded Autobahn is enough for you to appreciate the balance Bentley has found between giving the driver the best driving experience possible whilst still keeping him safe.

Bentley Continental GT Speed (pictures)

After getting my adrenaline suitably pumping I returned the car into drive mode and reflected that the direction Bentley is going in might be technologically forward but emotionally it is looking back. Back to an era when driving was the greatest thrill on earth. Back to when what mattered wasn’t where you were going but how you got there. Back to when Bentley ruled the roads.

[VIDEO] CloudFlare CEO Matt Prince

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Thursday 29 August 2013 1:51 pm

VIDEO: Matthew Prince, CEO and co-founder of CloudFlare, talks about defending against a 100G-bps attack and what it takes to build a modern, scalable cloud platform. In March of this year, cyber-attackers launched the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack against the Internet ever reported. At the heart of efforts to blunt that attack was the CloudFlare platform, which was able to successfully defend against the massive onslaught and keep its clients online throughout the epic attack.

How did CloudFlare do it? In a video interview with eWEEK, CloudFlare CEO, Matthew Prince describes the tools, techniques and processes his firm used to defend against the immense attack.

Read the full story at eWeek:
CloudFlare CEO Talks About Fighting Off Largest Recorded DDoS Attack –

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

iOS 7 Beta Users Report Getting Locked Out Of Their iPhones

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Wednesday 28 August 2013 1:34 pm

iOS 7 Beta Users Report Getting Locked Out Of Their iPhones

Some developers and regular users alike who have installed the beta of iOS 7, Apple’s latest version of its mobile operating system, are reporting via Twitter that their iPhones are deactivating. 

Apple has never officially opened up the iOS 7 beta test to nondevelopers, who have had to use workarounds to install the software. Some may wonder if the company is now catching up with those who have downloaded it through alternative means. Many people on Twitter are reporting that their beta has been deactivated and are now having to downgrade to iOS 6.

It seems like some developers might have been caught in the dragnet as well.

However, Willis told us that logging into his developer account and upgrading to the latest iOS 7 beta 6 fixed the issue.

Patience is Key

The official iOS 7 is expected arrive on September 10. The company could be expiring previous versions of the iOS 7 beta prior to its release. Users that have not updated to the latest versions of iOS 7 beta are seeing their phones deactivate.

iOS updates are normally sent “over the air”—that is, wirelessly—straight to a user’s device. Users can also update iOS by connecting their phones to their computers and downloading the newest version through iTunes. It’s not clear why Willis’s phone didn’t do that.

We contacted Apple for comment and have not yet heard back. We will update if and when we hear back from the company.

If you are a developer and have access to Apple’s iOS Developer Center, the best thing you can do is to go straight and download iOS 7 beta 6 and reinstall the .ipsw file to your device. Follow these directions on how to download and install iOS 7 beta.

This story is developing. Adriana Lee contributed reporting.

Photo by aussiegall

Nintendo 2DS handheld targets new crowd

Posted by eXactBot Hosting | News | Wednesday 28 August 2013 7:21 am

CNET Update needs a bigger pocket:

In this episode of Update:

– Spend $50 less on Nintendo’s Wii U Deluxe when a new bundle comes out for $300 on September 20.

– See if there’s an appetite for the cheaper Nintendo 2DS portable system — which happens to be less portable than the 3DS.

– Save $100 on the unlocked Nexus 4 smartphone, now starting at $200. (Don’t be surprised if a Nexus 5 crops up later this year.)

– Read up on the new Kindle challengers from Kobo, the e-ink Aura and three color Arc tablets.

– Marvel at grown men in bird costumes driving go-karts in a teaser for the new Angry Birds Go game.

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